Electronic Device Regulations

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by jwilk13, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. jwilk13

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 15, 2011
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    Hi all,

    A friend of mine and I have just developed an electronic device (a PCB inside an enclosure, basically) and we think it may be marketable. We developed it because we had an immediate need, but looking back it seems like something that others may have a requirement for as well.

    What I'm wondering is what types of certifications, tests, etc would be required to sell the product? It is not an "intentional radiator" as the FCC says, so is it just a matter of EMI/EMC certification?

    Some more info: It's not a wireless device. It's a programmer for a certain range of devices, meant to be plugged into a bench-top DC power supply. It utilizes a 5V switcher, some various MOSFETs, and is microcontroller-based.

    Thanks :)
     
  2. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    technically no certifications are required at all.
     
  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    What he said is accurate. Certifications are only required if the customer is willing to pay for them.
     
  4. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    I guess you are thinking of marketing this in the United States. I think you can find most of what you need to know in CFR Title 47, part 15. Unless your product is excluded, you probably will need to get the EMI and RFI certification. If you have the money, having listed by UL is a good idea, but that's between your insurance company and you.
     
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  5. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    If it was a consumer product what you said is certainly true..
    But for a microchip programmer (if that's what it really is)...again NO certification is required at all and is just a waste of money.
     
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  6. jwilk13

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 15, 2011
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    It programs various programmable devices...NOT microcontrollers, but something else ;)

    I suppose it's not a "consumer" product in the sense that it's not for household or family use. It would be something that an engineer would use for testing or an assembler would use for programming finished products.
     
  7. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    If you can go for an external power supply. That already is approved. And bundle it with your device. State in your documentation that the user must use this power supply. Then you should be on the safe side. As least as I see it. But my knowlegde is primarily for equipment sold in the CE region
     
  8. jwilk13

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 15, 2011
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    The board does require an external power supply of approximately 30 VDC. There are voltage regulators on-board (including a 5V switcher, the others are linear). The customer can use any external DC power supply, as long as it can supply 300 mA at 30V.
     
  9. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    CE is a joke IMO.. :)
    self-certification... ha ha
     
  10. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    In my part of the world we have the "low voltage directive". The Directive covers electrical equipment with a voltage between 50 and 1000 V for alternating current and between 75 and 1500 V for direct current. For equipment with voltage below the "low voltage directive" Like yours things are less strict. And therefore the trick is to use external AC to DC converter with adequate approval. As most of expensive approval is already done. And you will be covered at your low 30 volt part of the equipment
     
  11. jwilk13

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 15, 2011
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    Well, I'm not supplying the power supply. That's something we're going to tell people they need to have in order for the product to work.
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Do think about insurance, this is a sue happy country. And there are always people looking for something for nothing.
     
  13. bertus

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    Apr 5, 2008
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  14. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    EXCELLENT point.. Of course anyone that is selling products SHOULD set up a company where you personally are not liable (corporation or s-corp or whatever it is I forgot). Its one thing to get sued and have to close the company.. Its another to get sued and they take your house.
     
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