Electron Flow And All That Stuff

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ElectronicMotor, Jul 1, 2016.

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  1. ElectronicMotor

    Thread Starter Member

    May 1, 2016
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    Sorry guys :oops:
    My statement is wrong:
    "By the conventions of Electronics, Current is NOT the flow of Electrons forced from a positive electric field to a negative electric field."
    It should read:
    By the conventions of Electronics, Current is NOT the flow of Electrons forced from a negative electric field to a positive electric field.
    :(
     
  2. profbuxton

    Member

    Feb 21, 2014
    233
    68
    And your answer is ?
     
  3. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,392
    1,605
    Can I phone a friend?

    BTW, current follows a strict definition applied to the physical process. Do see the excellent Wikipedia article on "electric current." Sorry I cannot make links on my device.
     
  4. Techno Tronix

    Member

    Jan 10, 2015
    140
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    Why you have given wrong statement? What you want to convey actually?
     
  5. Tonyr1084

    Active Member

    Sep 24, 2015
    535
    86
    Both statements leave me wondering where you're going with this.

    Electron flow is in the opposite direction as conventional current understandings.

    The reason why electrons flow in the direction they do is because (using a battery as reference) the negative terminal has an abundance of electrons - which are negatively charged. The positive end of the battery is considered "Positive" because of the protons which carry a positive charge. Since the proton is massively larger than the electron it's easier for the electrons to migrate. Hence, electrons (negative charge) will seek the path of least resistance from the negative end of the battery to the positive end where the protons (which are "Electron Deprived") absorb them. It's a one way trip for an electron. Whether through a wire or a resistor or a complex circuit - the migration is from negative to positive. THAT is electron flow.

    Conventional current (based on Benjamin Franklin's best guess) is from positive to negative. His guess (50/50) ended up being wrong. But that's how we've come to understand electronics all these years. Conventional current is from positive to negative. Electron flow is from negative to positive.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. MrAl

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    2,438
    492
    Hi,

    It also makes it simpler for us humans so that we dont have to keep thinking about the negative sign. Many things that are real are not negative, such as length, so we are used to not having to worry about a sign.
     
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