Electron Configuration

Discussion in 'General Science' started by Lightfire, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    21
    I really need help with this area. I really do not know. I know some but the rest not, which is the most important.

    My teacher made a table which consists of 8 rows and 5 columns but as to get only simple yet effective advice, if ever, I will post only one category.

    8 rows is consisting of Element, Symbol, Mass Number, Atomic Number, Proton, Neutron, Electron, Electron Configuration.

    Let me choose Mercury.

    Mercury element is itself, mercury. Its symbol, Hg. Its mass number, 201. Its Atomic Number, 80. Its proton, 80. Its neutron, 121. Its electron, 80.

    My teacher taught us that the total number of electron configuration should be equal in the total number of atomic.

    Therefore, my teacher answer at the electron configuration was, 1s^2, 2s^2, 2p^6, 3s^2, 3p^6, 4s^2, 3d^10, 4p^6, 5s^2, 4d^10, 5p^6, 6s^2, 4f^14, 5d^9.

    As you may notice, 5d^9 should be 5d^10. But my teacher taught us that you have to reduce the number if you think it is closer and she added that if you go more, the answer will be greater. So just minus, at least. She said.

    Now, I really cannot understand this. Would somebody give me a quiz and wait me to see if my answer is correct?

    Any help will be greatly appreciated and sorry for the bad explanation, if ever.

    Lightfire
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    In general the number of electrons should match the protons. On of the things that make metals is their outer electrons tend to float, they drift around a bit. It is also what makes metals conductive, this ability to pass electrons around.

    Insulators are just the opposite, they do not share electrons well, the electrons are bound tightly to the outer shells.

    It is also a large part of what drives chemistry.
     
  3. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  4. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    So for example I encountered an element which has a number of 86 protons. Just for example. So my electron configuration should be like this?

    s1^2, s2^2, p2^6, s3^2, p3^6, s4^2, d3^10, p4^6, s5^2, d4^10, p5^6, s6^2, f4^14, d5^10, p6^6

    which is equal also to 86.
    Please I need your help.
     
  5. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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