Electromagnetic Glove using Solenoid Need some advice!

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by AdeptisRahn, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0
    First, this is my first post here, and thankfully I found this site. As my title says, I am attempting to build an Electromagnetic glove. I have two small solenoids I can purchase to place in the palm so this will work. My questions are as follows:

    The first solenoid I am looking at is 55 lbs (25kg) Lifting Force
    12VDC, 8 Watts, Continuous Duty

    The second is
    22 lbs (10kg) Lifting Force 12VDC, 5 Watts, Continuous Duty

    1. I am unsure of my power source. What should I use? I had thought of 2 9V batteries connected in series. Will this work? If not what should I use for each? I am more interested in the 55lb lifting force one, but if the power source is unrealistic (like a motorcycle or car battery), then I will downgrade in size.

    2. What size wire should I use? Stranded or Solid?

    3. Will this even work? I understand I will not be lifting up cars or anything like that, but if this just a dumb idea?

    4. (Last one). If this will work, what are some negative side effects that I may have to keep an eye on?
     
  2. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,156
    3,064
    You haven't said what you hope to accomplish. Be as detailed as possible. A sketch might help.

    Controls to open and close? How much weight to lift? Size, cost, other constraints? Power source in a pocket, on the floor, up your sleeve?

    We can't read your mind!

    9-volt batteries will not likely give you much lifting current, if you mean to power an electromagnet.
     
  3. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0
    Sorry about that. New to this.

    There's no real goal to accomplish, just to build it. I would like it to be capable of utilizing its lifting capacity. As I said, the solenoid has a 55lb lifting capacity, so somewhere close to that.

    Basically, I sewed a glove to a old arm brace. Then I sewed a pocket for a small switch. The solenoid will be mounted in the palm of the glove. I understand the design and the set up. I just need to know if a 12VDC 8 Watts solenoid can be powered by 2 9V batteries in series, and powered enough to function as the solenoid is intended too? Or will I need something bigger? I'd like to keep it man portable, preferably on my arm. If the 9V's wont work, I could use something bigger. I'm stuck on what size wire to use and what power source to use.
     
  4. Dodgydave

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 22, 2012
    5,005
    745
  5. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234
    so basically, you want to attach a 55lb solenoid to your hand, and lift a 55lb load? whats going to help lift your arm once the weight is stuck to the solenoid on your palm?
     
    DerStrom8 likes this.
  6. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,156
    3,064
    That's pretty much where I was going, too. I guess I still don't understand the purpose. It won't make you stronger. If you can't lift a 50lb weight now, adding this thing won't help.

    A 55lb solenoid has the potential to break fingers, cause bruising and blood blisters, all that sort of thing. Maybe even break your wrist. I'd be reluctant to mess around with it.
     
  7. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0
  8. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234
    We know what you are saying, what we are asking is how are you going to lift a 55lb weight that is attached to the solenoid that is mounted on the glove?
     
  9. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0
    Ah, well I probably won't. I have no real intention of lifting anything that heavy. It'll be more for the attracting power than lifting. I just dont know what kind of, forces I guess is the best word, that I'll be playing with. If I am not using it to actually lift, should I get a smaller lifting capacity one? Like a 22lb?
     
  10. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,771
    971
    Could make a great "dropped pile of small metallic object picker-upper"

    "Oh crap..just dropped a huge box of screws all over the floor..go-go gadget gloves"
     
  11. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0

    Exactly!
    The glove will need to be able to move small objects around, chairs, empty file cabinets ect, hopefully anyway. Thats what Im looking to do.
     
  12. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    That's kind of what people were asking you! They were asking what you intended to do with the gloves, and you didn't give a straight answer. :p

    As mentioned before, 2 9v batteries in series will give you twice the voltage, but the current capacity will be too low to do you much good. I would also recommend a driver of some sort. A battery hooked up to an electromagnet for even a few seconds will get very warm, and the wrong type of battery will explode.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2012
  13. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0
    Here goes my lack of knowledge again: Whats a driver?

    Sorry about the confusion, I guess I wasn't understanding what everyone was trying to ask lol. Now that I figured out, it was a pretty simple question.
     
  14. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234
    a driver is anything used to drive larger inductive loads.... such as a ULN2803 Relay Driver IC.
     
    DerStrom8 likes this.
  15. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,156
    3,064
    An empty filing cabinet is a "small object"?

    Well anyway, the surface lifting force of an electromagnet depends on the current going through its windings. The heat those windings produce goes up with the square of that current. So, for given set of windings and heat removal system, there is a maximum current and lifting force, above which the thing burns up.

    How much continuous current is this thing rated for? I'd probably aim to supply no more than 75% of that, just to build in a safety margin. Once you (and we) know the target current, we can help suggest ways to achieve and control it.
     
  16. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    Thanks BMorse. To add to that, I'll just say that it usually uses specially-timed pulses to increase efficiency and reduce heating in the coils. It's just a way to protect the power source and the device being powered.
     
    BMorse likes this.
  17. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0
    12VDC, 8 Watts, Continuous Duty

    That's all the technical info it gives me. I know anoth
    er company sells a smaller one, about 11lb lifting capacity and it has the current listed at 0.33A. I mean 55lb lift seems a little much to me for what I need, and judging from people's reaction might be a little dangerous.
     
  18. pityocamptes

    Member

    Jul 25, 2012
    75
    0
    Spydy man comes to mind...
     
  19. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,156
    3,064
    OK, that's 0.67A. Quite manageable.

    Now it just comes down to how big a battery pack you can live with.
     
  20. AdeptisRahn

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 23, 2012
    9
    0
    I would like the battery to be portable. Preferable on the glove itself, so the whole system will be self contained. I can use some mounted in a backpack or "fanny pack" if need be, but from what I understand the further the power source is from the electromagnet, the weaker it is. I originally thought two 9v's would work?
     
Loading...