elctric charge

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ronn, Nov 16, 2007.

  1. ronn

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 1, 2007
    16
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    hi, my name is ronn and i 'd like to ask what is really this electric charge means. I'd read some information about it and says it is something that an electron or proton carry. Is this charge something made of matter having a substance or just a description of an effect? i'm a little bit confused.
    thanks a lot
     
  2. sparkchaser

    New Member

    Nov 15, 2007
    5
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  3. sparkchaser

    New Member

    Nov 15, 2007
    5
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  4. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    144
    Electric charge is a fundamental property of subatomic particles, notably protons (positive charge) and electrons (negative charge). The electromagnetic field is the effect of electric charge which influences the behaviour of electrically charged objects (down to other subatomic particles) within its vicinity.

    Dave
     
  5. ronn

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 1, 2007
    16
    0
    thanks for your reply
    by analogy , do you mean charge is like what a mass has something to do with gravity?
    thanks again
     
  6. cheddy

    Active Member

    Oct 19, 2007
    87
    0
    Not so much. Gravity is a universal attractive force. Charge can be either attractive or repulsive depending on polarity.
     
  7. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    Charge is related to which way the particle is spinning as it moves along. If an electron sized particle spins one way as it zinga along, it has a negative charge and we call it an electron. If it spins the "wrong way" while traveling, it has a positive charge and we call it a "positron."

    The two different spins make two different electrical fields that attract each other. Similar spins make similar electrical fields that push against each other. They work sort of like little bitty weather systems. Sort of.
     
  8. cheddy

    Active Member

    Oct 19, 2007
    87
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    Huh? What about ions? Aren't they a little more ubiquitous and easier to use to explain attractive and repulsive forces than matter-antimatter?
     
  9. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    No. Ions simply have extra electrons or fewer electrons. Charge itself comes from spin.

    Don't blame me for how the universe works, I didn't invent the thing!:D
     
  10. ronn

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 1, 2007
    16
    0
    from my basic question that i ask
    and deducing from the information that we talked about,
    it looks like charge is not substantial (not material) it is more of
    description of an effect? Am i right?
    thanks a lot for those who answered and give their thoughts of it.
     
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