Education / What's it like in your Country?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by killivolt, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. killivolt

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    I'm going to say not enough emphasis is placed on the 3 R's and more so, when did it become required to take spanish in grade school?

    My Grand daughter is learning spanish in the first Grade, why? (Edit: I got it wrong my Daughter just told me she's in ESL, which is for English as a Second Language.) it's for Hispanic who need more time learning and reading English.

    In a way I would have to say, the lack of importance given in Schools promoting other classes and sports seems like a waste of time, all of that should be outside of school and more time spent in the Sciences, Math and English.

    There are country's who teach English.

    I understand that, slowly Japanese and Chines now, Korean. Don't forget French and German, because of our global market.

    I just don't get Spanish, do we do that much trade with South America?
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2013
  2. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    It is not about trading pardners.

    I learned Latin, French and Spanish in school. I wish I could speak German, Greek, Chinese, etc...

    It is about learning about history, origins of language, culture and ethnic diversity.
     
  3. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    First grade is the perfect time to learn a new language. I think your capacity to learn at that age is the highest it will ever be. However, you must use it or lose it.
     
  4. killivolt

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    Jan 10, 2010
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    Right, that's why kids from another country will learn and retain, most people I know who learn spanish can't now. I think she should spend all her time in Reading and Writing English, Math is the new Language and is Universal.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2013
  5. MaxHeadRoom

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    Jul 18, 2013
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    India, the second largest English speaking country in the World.!
    Max.
     
  6. killivolt

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    That makes you think a bit.

    Do you speak French?
     
  7. MaxHeadRoom

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    I learned a little at school in the U.K. but my wife is french so I have a residing translator, if needed.;)
    Max.
     
  8. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    I've always loved the sound of French. I tried taking it in high school in Laredo TX, but my french teacher, who was a Mexican American, lost her whole family in Mexico to bandits when they were on vacation. I don't know how she survived, but that was the end of French being taught at that school. Trying to learn Spanish in that part of Texas is futile, too many people use it as an easy grade, and there is no catching up.
     
  9. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    The Hispanic population in the US is large and growing. Politicians want the Hispanic vote, so rather than insist that immigrants learn English, they insist that Spanish be taught in schools. You might not know that English is not the official language of the US; there is no official language of the US.
     
  10. killivolt

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    I can understand some of the Hispanic Population "Older" people not wanting to learn English. Just like "Little China Town" your not going to hear "English" But, If I go to another country, they will not speak "English" yet in America we cater the Hispanic Population.

    Here in Utah, we have many people who speak Spanish as well as many other languages, because of the Mormon Population. Their Missionary program is one of the best in the world, the institute has a Language center and they work with missionary's from all around the world.

    If I go to South America and expect people to speak English they would just laugh at me, and I had better learn Spanish quick. If I'm going to stay for an extended period in any country with that expectation. Either I learn that language or hire an interpreter or both.

    I know a bit of Spanish, But I force people to speak English. It's the only way they will ever learn it, to many people allow them to get by without learning.

    I'll bet I would be semi fluent if I lived in South America 3 months. I would force myself, in every waking moment.

    Is English really that difficult to learn for a "Spanish Speaker", am I to insensitive ?
     
  11. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    Are you guessing or it was an actual experience? Where? With whom?
     
  12. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    If it were just a matter of starting kids off on learning a foreign language at a young age, I wouldn't have any problem with it at all. I think the "common wisdom" is still that kids that learn two languages at a young age tend to do better in both languages than if they just learned one and that, even as adults, have a much easier time learning other languages. I could even accept that Spanish is a reasonable choice for being that second language. Where I have the problem is that we are often enabling kids that don't speak English to be able to get by without learning to speak English and this is not doing them or their futures any favors.

    We are very fortunate at my daughter's present school (she's in first grade). They are learning Spanish (and my daughter also has -- or had -- a decent working knowledge of Chinese but she's not using it enough to retain it) but the English expectations are still pretty high. I've been amazed time and again at her vocabulary, both written and spoken, and they are already having them recognize not only nouns and verbs but adjectives and adverbs as well. They taught them to write in cursive in kindergarten and her handwriting is already better than mine ever was. Her math education is also moving right along and they are doing addition and subtraction of numbers up to 20 and just starting to learn the concepts of addition in a positional numbering system.
     
  13. tracecom

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    Sounds like a great school. Here in Tennessee, most schools have stopped teaching cursive writing, and practically no one under the age of 21 or so knows how. Of course, they can all thumb out text messages at high speed (double entendre intended).
     
  14. killivolt

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
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    Ok, I was exaggerating, you caught me. The only time they laugh is when I try to speak it:( let alone in Argentina.

    You guy's would really have some fun with me:p

    You should here me when I go buy food at the mexican market:rolleyes:

    I want to buy Rosetta Stone. It's just not in my budget right now.

    Anyone ever try it?
     
  15. WBahn

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    I tend to take Rosetta Stone's claims with a huge grain of salt. First off, they talk about learning a new language the same way you learned your first, yet my understanding is that the way the young human mind acquires language involves processes that simply don't exist in an adult brain. Also, you acquire your first language by total immersion over the course of several years, not in your spare time over the course of a few weeks, as they would have you believe.

    Here's a review that might be worth taking a look at:

    http://www.mezzoguild.com/2013/04/19/rosetta-stone-review/
     
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  16. WBahn

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    It is a great school. The students are technically required to wear uniforms, but the list of allowed items is broad enough that it doesn't really seem like they are in "uniform" -- just a bunch of kids that are neatly dressed. They have homework almost every day, but it isn't excessive by any means. Typically takes about half an hour and most of that is just the expectation that they spend 20 minutes a day reading.

    She is really fourishing there and we hate the thought of having to pull her out, but we will almost certainly be moving before next school year. Our biggest concern is that she will end up in a school that she is too far advanced for and that she will become bored and get into trouble. She is already young for her grade (a week younger and she would be in kindergarten).
     
  17. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    That is idiocy that has bugged me for years, taking foreign language was also required when I was in high school (late 60's). I recall they did testing and found that about 1/3 of students entering HS read at a level of fifth grade or lower in English.

    Worse than that.... about 15% of HS seniors still read at fifth grade level, so the school was failing them.

    When you have that many people who are functional illiterates in their OWN language, why on earth are they wasting the time to teach them a second language?
     
  18. Georacer

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    Nov 25, 2009
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    I don't think that dedicating 2-4 hours a week to learn a foreign language at the age of 10 is going to pull resources from learning the native language.

    In fact, I get a bit pissed when I see colleagues of mine not being able to communicate in English, because it is certain that at one point, they are going to leech onto someone else to read or write a text in English.

    Now, I know I am excessive and probably not objective, but to me, at the year 2013 in Greece, not knowing English at a basic "read a sign" level, is the same as not knowing how to cook pasta or calculate 5*12.
     
    killivolt likes this.
  19. MaxHeadRoom

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    There are many sociological avenues here.
    I was born in an English speaking country (UK :)) and I guess I am fortunate that English is considered a 'Universal' language by many.
    And really the only basic reason for language IMO, is the ability to communicate with another human being.
    But what I do not support is the imposition of a language or other standards on one section of a particular population for the reason I call 'Ethnic Nationalism' in order to preserve what is percieved by some as a 'Way of Life'.
    This is being done with French in the province of Quebec here in Canada, where strict laws are attempting to being imposed on anyone that flaunts a strict language code in order to what is perceived as an erosion of a particular ethnic way of life.
    I am of the opinion that you cannot legislate or impose Culture, it evolves naturally, for want of a better word, and should be allowed to, from many sources, especially when considering North America in General.
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
  20. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    Careful Max, you're on the verge of getting into politics which on AAC is interdit, prohibido, verboten!
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2013
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