Eagle Help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by khushal1988, Dec 14, 2010.

  1. khushal1988

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 12, 2010
    70
    0
    i am designing a PCB layout and i have a bit confusion that if the trace size is narrow or wider do it affect the PCB i mean in the transfer of current. if yes then tell me what should i keep in order to avoid difficulties facing afterwards. my files are attached if trace size should be increased please tell me how much i can increase.
     
  2. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    906
    Those are all 10-mil traces. Why did you make them so small? What currents will they need to handle? Wasn't this due, like yesterday?

    John
     
  3. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
    4,670
    804
    Traces should be way thicker, generally if it is not something very fast, use as thick traces as you can that doesn´t make problems with clearances.

    Right now you have 0.01, if you change all traces to 0.32 it starts looking ok. You can change all if you first select everything, then use the change tool and select the right width, ther right click and select change:group.

    On the output transistor use as thick traces as you can fit.
     
  4. khushal1988

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 12, 2010
    70
    0
    It will be using 24v+ nd 12v+ , it is due by tomorow told ill delay 1 day . Nd traces more thn ds cant be made what can i do in order to make thm work correctly plz smone make the width correct for me .
     
  5. tyblu

    Member

    Nov 29, 2010
    199
    16
    click the "wrench" icon (change icon), select "width", pick somewhere 20 and 40 thou [0.5-1mm], then click the trances whose widths you want changed.

    edit: "width" is also a dropdown value when you select the "line" or "route" tool
     
  6. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    906
    How about checking your spelling? I have no idea what you are asking. I asked current; you give voltage.

    Hint: If you make all of the traces arbitrarily wider, you may/will have problems with clearance.

    Kermit2 gave you a good routing for the board. I am sure he spent considerable time on it. You didn't like it. So, I used almost the same arrangement of components and gave you another routing. I changed the position of one resistor to avoid needing a jumper. As I stated at the time, it was not a routing I would use, but it was a starting point. That was days ago, and you have not changed one pixel of either attempt to help YOU route this board. What have you been doing in the meantime besides begging for someone to do it for you?

    John
     
  7. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    You can download PCBtemp from Roman Blacks' website:
    http://www.romanblack.com/pcbtemp.htm

    PCBtemp will tell you what the thermal rise will be for a given current vs trace width and copper thickness. If the thermal rise is too great, the trace will do anything from lift off the board to vaporize like a fuse.

    I don't see why you want to make a new board. You have what was a working board already; you simply have the wrong equipment to solder/desolder components.

    A soldering gun is not a good tool to use on PCBs. It gets too hot, too quickly.

    You should be using a temperature controlled iron with a conical tip for small connections, and a chisel tip for things like the MOSFETs.

    You need to use the right solder (63/37 or 60/40), rosin flux, and isopropyl alcohol to clean the board and components before and after soldering. Your soldering iron should be clean and tinned.

    Trying to make a new board means that you'll have to drill holes for all the parts, which isn't easy to do. You'll probably snap a lot of drill bits the first time. You really need to use a drill press. Most of the holes will need to be 0.032", which is quite a small bit.
     
Loading...