Dust effect on internet connection

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Black-Bird, Mar 10, 2011.

  1. Black-Bird

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    Jan 26, 2011
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  2. Wendy

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    Only if the components get hot because the fans and heatsinks are plugged.
     
  3. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    What about the effects on wireless?

    John
     
  4. Black-Bird

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    Jan 26, 2011
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    yes ,wireless effect is where am having a real trouble ?
     
  5. Wendy

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    Inside or outside? Even if the wireless had to cut through the dust outside, I have trouble believing it would radically affect the signal. I've been wrong before, but dust is not metallic, and while it is optically thick, it isn't that dense overall. RF shouldn't have that much trouble with it, unless you are on the fringe of the routers range.
     
  6. loosewire

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    Is that smog from manufactoring and tall buildings.
    That will affect wi-fi and you have to have users on line. .
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2011
  7. Adjuster

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    Dec 26, 2010
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    The URL for the picture suggests a sandstorm:

    http://
    lh6.ggpht.com/_g4jfQ9COILQ/SjtOOgLYZZI/AAAAAAAAHrE/EpDcI6JBgAk/Saudi_Arabia_Sandstorm9%5B2%5D.jpg
     
  8. jpanhalt

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  9. Wendy

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    Reading through the articles, they mostly talk about 35Gig, not 3Gig. Those frequencies are in the K band, not 2.5 gig.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11

    Most WiFi setups I've ever dealt with were indoors, either home or hotel. I haven't had a lot of experience with outdoor uses. With indoor setups the outside weather should have no effect what so ever.

    The highest freq is 5 gig, but as far as I can tell 2.5 Gig is the norm.

    2.5 Gig used to be used by the 10' dishes, as well as being the land line frequency of choice used by long distance telephone carriers way back when. The technologies were very similar, even interchangeable in many cases. While rain had a major adverse effect, the signal still got through better than K Band systems and modern satellite setups.

    2.5 Gig is also very close to the freq used by microwave ovens. Not pertinent, but interesting. The microwaves do heat the water nicely.

    The 3G and 4G systems are basically modified cell phone setups as far as I know. I don't know their frequency ranges, but they are only slightly longer than short range setups, as cells are meant to be very close and overlapping to work. Their range is, what?, 1 mile or so?

    I guess I would have to ask the OP what kind of systems is he talking about. Most modern broadband systems use FIOS or standard telephone wires (as in DSL) to get to point of use, then is disseminated wirelessly from there. I don't know anything about the city wide systems I've been reading about.
     
  10. jpanhalt

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    I have a home in a rural area and Internet is difficult to get. At first, I though that 3G and 4G had something to do with the frequency (I really don't keep up on cell phone technology, nor do I use a cell phone). Then I learned it was only a promotional gimmick to refer to the 3rd and 4th generation. Unfortunately, even at 1 GHz, trees interfere. That is a problem as my farm is surrounded by woods. However, above 3 GHz, you are into radar frequencies where dust storms as in the Middle East interfere (see the third reference I gave). I was thinking more of interference with the satellite downlink than of interference with a LAN.

    John
     
  11. Black-Bird

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    Jan 26, 2011
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    No,this is a sandstorm and believe me you don't want to get caught up in a sandstorm .

    Today we had a very bad sandstorm and I think it might had an effect on my internet connection ,I assume the atoms consisting the dust particles can absorb the RF waves thus reducing its power
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 10, 2011
  12. RRITESH KAKKAR

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    Jun 29, 2010
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    hi, jpanhalt are you trying to do some thing in satellites, if you want to ask some question about it, check this.

    http://www.dishtracking.com/forum/index.php
     
  13. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    Only if you are getting your internet via satellite. Fiber optic would be immune, but as John pointed out, we don't know how your internet is being delivered.
     
  14. Black-Bird

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    Jan 26, 2011
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    Wireless , the router is in the room next to where am sitting and the router is positioned outside the window (on the edge of the window) so it gets hit constantly but dust particles
     
  15. Wendy

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    That is the local delivery, I'm referring to how it is delivered to the house. Again, unless your wireless router is being buried or outside I doubt it would have any effect. The RF wireless signal is line of site, if there isn't anything extra between the antenna and the computer in question (or nothing new) then there would be no change.

    If the wireless router is being filled with dust then components could be overheating for lack of air flow, which is what I suggested in my first post. If it is full of dust and grit you need to clean it out, but that is not an RF problem, it is equipment being abused (you never let something like a computer fill with dust). This relates to another thread referring to preventative maintenance, you can do basic maintenance or let the equipment die and buy new every year or so.
     
  16. jpanhalt

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    I think he is talking about a dust storm like in Flight of the Phoenix with James Stewart -- a great movie (IMHO). Oklahoma during the Depression was like that, but they didn't have Internet then.

    John
     
  17. Wendy

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    We get a storm like that in Texas every decade or so. Pain in the posterior it is. While the house gets dusty, the dust inside isn't anything like it is outside. I can see it killing equipment, but not degrading RF by itself. It just isn't that dense.

    When it happens the standard joke is "Here comes Oklahoma".

    My roots are from Oklahoma. Never heard the stories from my family, but I remember watching documentaries where the dust was killing people, or permanently crippling them, by filling their lungs with the dust.
     
  18. jpanhalt

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    My dad was an okie and grew up in Purcell. He served in the Pacific and just never made it back there -- wonder why. He was a bright guy.

    John
     
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