Drive an LED from Static?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by cjdelphi, May 6, 2009.

  1. cjdelphi

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 26, 2009
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    Anyone know if it would be possible to convert lots and lots of static into a safe low voltage to power an LED?
     
  2. Slider2732

    Member

    May 6, 2009
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    In a general sense ? like scrubbing your feet along carpet and an LED glows ?
    I would think so, based on a bridge rectifier, few capacitors and then resistors to the LED's. One key element would be about storing such a large charge quickly and efficiently, to be drained slower by the LED's....something that wouldn't blow up on hitting that massive brick of a charge as it dissipates into the device.

    Fun idea. I'll now hand you over to the regulars, who would probably know more. This being my first post lol
     
  3. infomercialscam

    New Member

    May 7, 2009
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    0
    Hello Friends,

    I read your question and according to me , On bridge rectifier, few capacitors and then resistors to the LED's. One key element would be about storing such a large charge quickly and efficiently, to be drained slower by the LED's....something that wouldn't blow up on hitting that massive brick of a charge as it dissipates into the device
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    You simple aren't going to get that much energy off conventional static. I'd be tempted to use a neon bulb though, they are actually more efficient than LEDs, IMO.
     
  5. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    Yep...neon or any plasma-based device. :)
     
  6. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    What's the point of slightly paraphrasing a previous post?
     
  7. kakin

    New Member

    Mar 24, 2009
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    maybe using some kind of transformer/coil to step down the voltage enough to store in a capacitor. I've heard of pulse transformers so maybe that could be used, but i have no experience with them.
     
  8. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    The process of discharge into a capacitor needs no conversion. All the electrons are captured (though they might leak off, which is what usually happens to a static charge). The more you try to manupulate such a low power source, the greater your losses.

    Lightning is the exception to the rule, but it is so chaotic that anyone would have a lot of trouble harvesting it. That and it is also a case of power being too concentrated.
     
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