Doubt regarding Charge

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by smslca, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. smslca

    Thread Starter Member

    May 11, 2009
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    Hi,

    Can any body explain/prove the following statement?

    According to experimental observations, the only charges that occur in nature are integral multiples of the electronic charge e = −1.602 × 10 -19C.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. sage.radachowsky

    Member

    May 11, 2010
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  3. sage.radachowsky

    Member

    May 11, 2010
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    By the way, I can't prove it.

    I think that is referring to the charge of a single electron, but who is really to say that there are no other charges than an electron or a proton? I bet other particles have charge, and who is to say that they are the same as an electron?

    It all gets wacky at the particle level.

    By the way, can anyone explain to me how a magnetic field is generated by an electron moving in a straight wire?
     
  4. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    The "integral multiples" part simply means that the charge on an electron is a fundamental property. As that quantity of charge can't be divided into smaller amounts, then charge can only accumulate in fixed amounts equal to the charge on the number of electrons present.
     
  5. davebee

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 22, 2008
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  6. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    I don't know (does anyone really) if the list is comprehensive, but Wikipedia gives a list of fundamental particles and their charges. Some are not integral multiples of the electron charge.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_particles
     
  7. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    Sage, you really should ask your questions in our own thread.

    The answer lies in one of Maxwells equations, which contains Amperes Law.
     
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