Doing a master's in Electronics with a degree in Physics

Discussion in 'Career Advising' started by PauloConstantino, Sep 18, 2016.

  1. PauloConstantino

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 23, 2016
    121
    5
    Dear friends!

    I'd like your advice on this please if you have a good one!

    I have a degree in mathematics and I have been interested in electronics for a long time. I have applied for a master's in Digital Electronics at my university and they have accepted me to do the course. However, I am a bit concerned that the course might be a bit difficult since I don't have a first degree in Electronics. I do have an extensive background in computer science and architecture, low level programming and so on. And I have been studying electronics for a good while, but still, my knowledge is not as extensive as someone who has a degree in Electronics.

    What do you think? Will I struggle? Will I survive?

    Best and thank you!
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2016
  2. DGElder

    Member

    Apr 3, 2016
    345
    85
    I think you will do quite well. I am curious, outside of not having to take a number of foundation courses required for a BS, such as the typical math curriculum, how do you see your Masters work differing from the study for a BS in Digital Electronics?
     
  3. PauloConstantino

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 23, 2016
    121
    5
    I apologize that I'm not sure I understood what you meant (English is not my first language).

    But if I understood you, the only reason why I am choosing to do a Masters is because I can only get funds from the government for a master's and not for a second BS. Otherwise my god... I would go for the BS yesterday! My only option to get into Electronics industry is to do this Masters. And that's why I am a bit worried. I don't think it will be impossible but challenging. However I learn everything quite quickly and I am a big nerd so I hope things will go well! :p

    Thank you very much for saying that I will do well. I really need these words :)

    Best wishes!
     
  4. DGElder

    Member

    Apr 3, 2016
    345
    85
    Your academic advisor should be able to answer these questions and help you construct a course schedule that fits your excellent, if atypical, background and that fits your career aspirations. Good luck to you.
     
  5. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
    2,004
    394
    If you are any good with math.....you should have no problem with digital electronics.

    Why mention physics? Is math and physics the same there?
     
  6. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
    821
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    Usually, you would be required to take any prerequisite courses before you could take the advanced classes.
     
  7. PauloConstantino

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 23, 2016
    121
    5
    The course

    I should have written Mathematics in the title.......... I don't know why I typed physics !! I had it in my head.

    Yes I have a degree in Mathematics. I am good at math. But isn't not having a degree in Electronics kind of a difficulty ? I mean, I know a lot of digital electronics theory.... I have a good foundation in electronics in general. I am just a bit afraid that I might be a bit behind those who have a 3 year degree in electronics..... But hopefully I will catch up and everything will be okay....
     
  8. PauloConstantino

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 23, 2016
    121
    5
    Here in the UK there are no pre-requisite courses. For a master's it's required you have a related degree. Some universities will take mathematicians for a master's in electronics without any issues, others are a bit more difficult. I got a place but I am only trying to get some perspective from you guys on how difficult it might be for me.

    Has anyone here got a degree in Electronics? Is year 3 in an electronics degree much more difficult than year 1 or about the same?
     
  9. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
    821
    229
    I have a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering. I don't know what the requirements are for a degree in Digital Engineering, but I'll assume that it is a sub-degree of Electrical Engineering. Have you taken classes in Thermodynamics, Statics and Dynamics, Physics, Electronic Circuits, Control Theory, Electromagnetic Theory and Stochastic Processes?

    You have all the math prereqs, but there are a lot of engineering prereqs that you might be lacking.

    Each year is an order of magnitude more difficult that the previous.
     
  10. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
    3,250
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    It depends on the individual.

    I once worked for someone who had a BS in Physics and a MS in EE. He was one of the best analog circuit designers I ever worked with. And I've worked with people who had BSEE degrees who were surprisingly ignorant about the subject. It depends on the individual...
     
  11. PauloConstantino

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 23, 2016
    121
    5
    Yes I have the physics pre-req as well.

    Cool. I think so too. I have a good foundation in electronics, and a very strong foundation in digital electronics and computer science so I should be fine with the course. I will do my best to study what I don't know and learn stuff really quickly so I don't stay behind.

    If I am good with circuit analysis, for example node analysis, thevenin, norton;
    If I have good knowledge of capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors, bjt's, mosfets and so on;
    If I have an excellent knowledge of all kinds of digital structures from flip flops, to decoders, plexers, onto the workings of an entire CPU;
    If I have excellent low level programming skills,

    Is this enough for me to take on the course? What else am I be expected to know ? Does a graduate electronics engineer know much more beyond this ?
     
  12. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,777
    4,805
    Most people that struggle in an EE program (grad or undergrad) do so because of either a weakness in mathematics or a weakness in physics (or both). So if you have a solid (note the use of the term "solid") foundation in both of those, then you should do fine. Yes, you will have to fill in some gaps, particularly in terms of circuit analysis and design techniques, but that solid understanding should make both of those pretty straightforward.

    Most of the rest of the people that struggle do so because of a lack of problem solving skills, which is something that seldom characterizes someone that has a solid math and/or physics background.
     
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