Do you ever....

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by samuel.whiskers, Apr 12, 2014.

  1. samuel.whiskers

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 17, 2014
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    stop forgetting to put heatshrink on the wire before soldering a switch/terminal in place?? Just when I thought I'd grown out of that one.... did it twice today! :rolleyes:
     
  2. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    sometimes.....
     
  3. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    A worse one is where you are so concerned with not forgetting the heatshrink... That you connect the two wires reversed and THEN do the heatshrink over them perfectly.

    Doh! :eek:
     
    PackratKing, atferrari and Metalmann like this.
  4. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    I'm so happy I now have a team of technicians for building that can forget these things for me.
     
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  5. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    Tell me about going up in the ladder of success! :p
     
  6. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
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    You are still ultimately responsible for Their screw-ups y'know...:D
     
  7. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    No he's not. I have never once had a manager of boss take the blame for my screw up. I however have been blamed countless times for doing something wrong just like I was told to do so by my manager or boss. :(
     
  8. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    Yes, a boss is responsible for his subordinates. The boss may or may not accept the responsibility, but it is his, nonetheless. That doesn't mean the boss is always to blame for mistakes made by his subordinates, but blame and responsibility are two very different things. Sometimes accepting responsibility means taking whatever actions are necessary to prevent recurrence of the mistakes, up to and including terminating the subordinate. Most of the time, it's simply a matter of providing better instructions and/or tools to the subordinate, along with a supportive attitude.
     
  9. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
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    I have been in that boat as well, and you had better believe I thoroughly documented the situation when I felt the "boss" was wrong, and in most cases, damn glad I did... :D

    Tracecom, has a valid point as well...
     
  10. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    The thing that bugged me with integrating control systems for industrial machinery, the controllers started out reasonably large and hence the cable connections had nice large multi-pin connectors that were easy to see and solder the multicore cables to.
    Gradually the controllers were reduced in size to a point where the connectors became micro miniature, and required the use of magnifiers, aggravated by eyesight that was not what it was.
    The irony is the machinery was still as large, so the miniaturization advantage of the control was lost IMO! :confused:
    Max.
     
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