DIY Wave Maker (for aquarium)

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Nate_Bro, May 12, 2011.

  1. Nate_Bro

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 2, 2011
    18
    0
    Well Sorry to bother you guys again and I hope to be able to contribute something after a little more learning on these circuits.

    I'm back at it again, you guys really helped out a lot with my last project, and now I have hit another wall....

    first I'm not sure how to hook up my "DIP SSR 8 pin"(IC solid State Relay)

    I'm also not sure if I really need it...

    this is the schematic I have gotten so far, its not done yet...
    Its based off of another circuit that feeds a controller, but I need to build my own controller as well.
    [​IMG]

    so here is the what I'm trying to do, get the outlets to turn on and off rapidly (PWM I think its called) it will control two pumps, while one if OFF, the other is ON, and vice versa... also I was going to use CAT5 line to run from the control box to the outlet box, they will be about 5-7 feet apart, will that make the resistance to great?

    also I'm not sure if the output of the 555 TIMER is enough to operate the AC SSRelays, so I was going to use a DC - DC DIP SSR IC to power the SSRelays is that needed or not?

    also I'm not sure exactly how the POT works, and I have been looking around, and not found a another circuit that uses the POT with the 555 Timer.

    and one last thing, the person that did this original circuit, said they added a second POT for better tuning, but they never said where they added it...

    sorry to bother you guys again, but your a great group and a big help, and I have learned a lot here, last time you guys drew me a great schematic, you don't have to do that this time, but you can if you like, but now I'm wanting to understand how all these parts fit and work together, I'm not just looking for someone to do it for me, so if you have links those are just as good to me as anything!

    thanks again for your time, you guys/girls? are great!
     
  2. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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  3. Nate_Bro

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 2, 2011
    18
    0
    ya not exactly, but it is a good idea, and gives me something to think about...

    do you have any other links too?

    thanks ;)
     
  4. nbw

    Member

    May 8, 2011
    36
    10
    I built a wavemaker for my tank a few years ago. One of the things that didn't work quite as well as I liked was the juddering as the 220V pumps snapped on. I tried making a soft-start circuit / zero-crossing detectors etc but it was beyond me - I got the pumps to run at about 70% but below that they'd fail.

    Have you considered DC pumps? I know they're not as common, but of course you can PWM them and they're smooth as.
     
  5. Nate_Bro

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 2, 2011
    18
    0
    I got a good AC pump, that is good for rapid on/off and dose not have the ill effects, like some of my other pumps..

    I have thought about the DC pumps, and they are not out of the question, for myself, but I do have a few others waiting for me to get this circuit working :)
     
  6. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,789
    945
    A little time spent looking over spec sheets will show many SSR devices that switch with very low current inputs.

    http://www.efx-tek.com/downloads/crydom_d2w.pdf is just one of many to be found. This one costs between 10 and 20 dollars depending on where you order from. There are some that are less than $10.

    A 555(not the CMOS version) can output over 100mA.

    I suggest you use the 555 circuit others have suggested to you and you mentioned in your original post. It can work. WE can help you make it work if for some reason you can't get it to.

    Redraw it, or repost it slightly smaller.

    Another option is using "float" switches on the two tanks which activate the other tanks motor, and turn off the source tanks motor. Not a relay, or timer circuit so you would also need to add a valve of some sort to the pumps which can throttle down the amount of water it moves over time. This would be a way of timing the back and forth action.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
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