DIY: RS-232 Wiring CNC Data Transfer to FANUC(Old computer's COM-Port to CNC-Mill)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by 123445, Jan 4, 2014.

  1. 123445

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    I bought a BELDEN V 9505NH 5PR SHIELDED 24AWG and the heads to make an own CNC(mill,turning) data transfer cable.

    I have got the parts and the guide:
    http://www.i-logic.com/serial/wiring.htm#What kind

    I need to know what to do with the "BLACK 5x PAIR WIRES" do I use them or do I just use the "COLORED 5x WIRES" ? (Does this slow down the transfer speed, if I leave the black ones out ?)
    Also what do I do with the "1x NAKED EARTHING WIRE" and "1x TRANSPARENT CENTER PLASTIC WIRE THING" ?

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  2. JohnInTX

    Moderator

    Jun 26, 2012
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    The twisted pairs in the cable are for RS485/RS422 which require each signal e.g. yellow wire to have its own ground return (the black wire twisted with it). RS232 requires only a single ground wire. The transfer speed is determined by the 9600 baud rate specified so as long as you have a good connection that doesn't pick up too much noise it works.

    Connect the colored wires as described in the 2ed table (the left column is mislabeled, its for DB9). The 5 wires on the DB9 side are typical for RS232 with hardware handshaking. Jumpering 6,8,20 on the DB25 side is also typical frequently required (they strap together lines that make the DB25 side think its connected to something) Use one of the black wires for GND if needed. Cut the others. The bare shield wire goes to the metal frame of the connector at each end- solder it to the metal DB frame if necessary or use metal housings that clamp the shield. The white 'center plastic wire' is a strand that reinforces the cable. Cut it off.

    The circled screws go through the ears of the hood and screw into the mating connector to keep the connectors together. They have machined collars next to the threads to retain them in the hoods. The screws go through the square, bent washers with the bend facing away from the head. Run the screw through the connector ears and lay in the hood with the washer outside before assembling the two halves. When the hood is assembled, the screw will be captive and the bent ears of the washer will help hold the split hood together when the screw is tightened.

    I would consider metal hoods for shielding.

    Some RS232 info here (from a Wikipedia link).
    A datasheet showing the screws/washers installed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  3. 123445

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    If I use plastic hoods what is the worse that could happen ?
    If I don't use "bare shield wire" or "one black wire as GND" what is the worse that could happen ? (I soldered only the colored ones)
     
  4. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,769
    969
    plastic hoods are fine..
    and it doesn't matter what color of wire you used as long as you have the plugs wired correctly.... data signals aren't racists ;)
     
  5. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,514
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    Regarding Fanuc and RS232, you usually only really need a 3 wire cable to
    2,3,5 with the 4-5 and 6-8-20 jumpered out on the Fanuc 25pin side.
    Fanuc needs to see the necessary level for Hardware handshake but use XON/XOFF for transmission control.
    What model Fanuc is it?
    Example pdf for connections.
    I would also obtain some small dia heatshrink to place over the pins after soldering.
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014
  6. 123445

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    "What model Fanuc is it?"
    - What buttons do I press to find out the Fanuc's model ?

    I bought an old computer+DIY cable to quickly transfer programs to old Mills:
    - I practice my milling skills in an adult education school and want to speed up the program's writing time.(No usb and "hand pushing" programs takes time.)
    + To get the CNC-diploma for milling we need to do one "competence test"(=one cnc'd piece that has 0,01mm tolerances and other nasty things.)

    I have the computer+cable(5pair) now ready:

    + What software do I need for my computer(Best+Easy to use+Fast) ?
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2014
  7. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    The model is normally above the CRT/LCD display?
    There is a freebee at Cadem Lite, you have to register, but it is a very good program.
    http://www.cadem.com/dnc.htm
    Hyperterminal that comes with WIN is a bit of a pain to set up and is not really geared to this app.
    If you want a decent book on programming G-M code, get the Peter Smid book.
    Max.
     
  8. 123445

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    It says...Fanuc O-M (I'm still waiting a new pata SSD for my old laptop so I haven't had a change yet to test my cable)
     
  9. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    So the PDF in Post #5 was appropriate!
    Al.
     
  10. 123445

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    Is there any way around using other than COM(serial)-port ?
    - Only old computers under 1000MHz processors have them...

    I'm planning to use also MasterCAM X5/X6 with the notebook to calculate 2D-points(X,Y) for milling routes.

    I now have Thinkpad T23(P3:1133Mhz, 1GB memory) and it probably doesn't run MasterCAM.
     
  11. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Just use the ThinkPad to download files to the Fanuc, use MasterCAM on a main desktop to develop the program, install Cadem lite on the L.Top.
    Max.
     
  12. 123445

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    Mastercam X3(2008) looks to be working fine on IBM Thinkpad T23(2001).
    - Will I be possible to go up a version X4,X5 ?
     
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