digital storage oscilloscope

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by gaurav1292, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. gaurav1292

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 1, 2009
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    I performed an experiment in which i had to measure the rise time of voltage across capacitor using digital storage oscilloscope. The readings i got was not quite accurate, therefore i decided to carry out this same experiment of multisim 11, but to my disappointment multisim doesn't have dso!
    Is there any software which supports dso? Or is there any way else to check my readings using any other circuit simulator?
     
  2. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Try LTspice, it's free and supposed to be pretty accurate.
     
  3. gaurav1292

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 1, 2009
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    Does it have Digital storage oscilloscope in it?
     
  4. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Graph it in a spreadsheet or use a pencil, calculator, and graph paper. You can even overlay your measurements at the same sampling time and you can compute the difference.

    You can do a transient analysis in your simulation.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2012
  5. aprillove1719

    New Member

    Jul 17, 2012
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    A digital storage oscilloscope is an oscilloscope which stores and analyses the signal digitally rather than using analogue techniques. It is now the most common type of oscilloscope in use because of the advanced trigger, storage, display and measurement features which it typically provides
     
  6. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    It displays waveforms from anywhere in the circuit.
    It's a little hard to get used to, not the sort of program that is easy to use without looking at the instructions. There are tutorials around if you search for them.
     
  7. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    Multisim does indeed have virtual digital oscilloscopes. See this for more info.
     
  8. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    aprillove,

    I do know what a dso is and have had one for many years. I still have an analog scopes also.

    I've worked with DSOs in the mid 80s. I think the first oscilloscope I worked with was a tektronics 535. I did work with older oscilloscopes than that ... but I don't remember the designations as it was part of the Loran-A equipment.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    I'm not familiar with these simulators that have virtual instruments in them. In the context of a simulator, what would be the difference between using a virtual DSO and a virtual analog scope. For instance, with an analog scope you can get a pretty good feed for the linearity of a circuit by applying a triangle wave input and seeing if the output range displayed on the scope is uniform in intensity. This is not possible with most DSOs. So would a virtual analog instrument permit this type of measurement in a simulation?
     
  10. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Intensity is not available on the virtual equipment. The OP probably wants a DSO so he can do FFT and all the other functions the DSO offers. In some programs, that means running the "different" analysis in lieu of pushing a button.

    I have seen videos at youtube claiming there is a dso in multisim. I haven't viewed those videos so I do not know if there is a "virtual" DSO with all the DSO bells and whistles.

    In answer to your question about the triangle wave and "intensity" here is the output of an amplifier. I'll add a few of the graphs from a simulation.
     
  11. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    What I'm talking about is triggering on a separate signal that is unrelated to the triangle wave. As a result, you overlay many, many sweeps and, if it is linear, the trace will spend as much time at any given point in the envelope as any other. Hence you will see a chaotic pattern that is uniform in intensity. If the circuit has a non-linearity, then you will get a gradiant or even bands of greater and lower intensity.
     
  12. BSomer

    Member

    Dec 28, 2011
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    Multisim does actually have a DSO in it. At least the version 10 does. I haven't used it in anything and in fact have rarely even used Multisim so I wouldn't be able to tell you where to begin with it.
     
  13. vk6zgo

    Active Member

    Jul 21, 2012
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    You carried out a real-world test with real components,& measured it with a real Oscilloscope.
    If your results differ a bit from theory,that is telling you something.
    Repeating it with a simulator may give you a result that looks like you copied it out of a textbook.
    Your Lecturer knows that the real world differs from theory,& will make allowances for your original (real) results,but may not be impressed by a "copybook" result.
    I would suggest that you present both sets of results.
     
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