Digital Multimeters

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Vince T, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. Vince T

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2010
    8
    0
    I have a new GE2524 digital multimeter. From the moment I opened the package I can not get a cosistent resistance or voltage reading. Is this to be expected or is the meter malfunctioning? I changed the battery to be sure.
    Thanks
     
  2. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
    312
    Resistance reading from what and voltage reading from what?

    Are you measuring a battery? If so, the meter should be set to DC and your readings should be awful steady.

    As for resistance, If you tried to measure a live circuit, you may have fried your meter.

    In resistance mode, (If there is more than I per setting, you may have to select between continuity, diode test, and OHMS) hold the two probes together.

    Does that give you a steady reading?
     
  3. bobbyrae

    Active Member

    May 14, 2009
    42
    1
    There have been times where it is very hard to hold the lead tips on the thing I am trying to measure the resistance of, and I had a problem like you describe. It turned out that I was using my fingers to hold the tips in place, but skin is conductive, so it was affecting the readings! I eventually figured it out.

    You need to give us some examples, though, because it depends on how much the readings are varying. If you are talking about 0.1 ohm, that's normal.
     
  4. Vince T

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2010
    8
    0
    Thanks,
    The resistors I'm trying to measure were bought in bulk. I think many of them were not any good because I could get a reading out of some of them.
    I am alo using a breadboard instead of my fingers.
     
  5. Vince T

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2010
    8
    0
    Retched,
    Thanks for your help. I was trying to evaluate a random number of resistors I bought. I think I got some bad ones in the bunch but had not tested all of them. Variations in read outs eventually went to zeroon a few of them.
     
  6. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
    312
    Thats not good.

    If you are getting a ZERO, something is wrong. There is no 0 ohms on a breadboard.

    I think you may be in the wrong mode. When you select the OHMS area on the meter, is there 2 or 3 other symbols? Like a diode and a speaker shape?

    It almost seems like you are measuring continuity.

    Also, your resistors, are they 1% 5% 10% or 20%ers?

    You will almost never get the same reading between two 10 or 20% resistors.

    If they are 330ohm resistors, you would be hard pressed to find a 330.00 ohm resistor in a bag of 10.

    A 330 ohm 10% resistor can ACTUALLY have between 297 and 363 ohms.

    They do sell 0 ohm SMD resistors, but they are used for jumpers, not resistance (obviously)

    If you are getting a ZERO and it is in continuity mode, the ZERO is usually an 'o' (oh) meaning 'open circuit'
     
  7. bobbyrae

    Active Member

    May 14, 2009
    42
    1
    VinceT said
    Variations in read outs eventually went to zeroon a few of them.

    I believe he means that the VARIATIONS that he was complaining about eventually were zero, therefore the values were reasonable and consistent. So there's no longer a problem with the meter. Am I right, Vince?
     
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