digital multimeter

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by carolb4, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. carolb4

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 20, 2010
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    0
    I have a Commercial Electric handheld digital multimeter. I'm trying to test parts of an icemaker and was told from this website to: Conduct this test with the refrigerator unplugged. Test the mold heater for resistance using a multitester. Set the multitester to the ohms setting X1. Place one probe into the hole labeled "H" and the other probe into the hole labeled "L". The multitester should read in the range of 60 to 90 ohms.
    This multimeter does not have X1 on the meter scale. There is 200, 2K, 20K, 200K, etc.

    I don't know how to test. Please advise.
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
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    The 200 scale reads to 200 ohms. (0 - 199).
     
  3. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    If 200 is the lowest scale then that is the one to use. X1 refers to the "times 1" scale.

    hgmjr
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I have replaced two icemakers over the years. It is my humble opinion that you will be better served to replace the icemaker with a new one. You will benefit in the long run.

    hgmjr
     
  5. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    The nomenclature "X1" is obsolete and comes from the days when multimeters were analog devices. The basic idea was that you multiplied the resistance reading on the analog meter scale by the factor after the X. Modern digital meters require no such conversions on the part of the user (other than, perhaps, knowing about SI prefixes).
     
  6. VoodooMojo

    Active Member

    Nov 28, 2009
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    I always liked 10 to the 24th.... yotta, yotta, yotta....
     
  7. VoodooMojo

    Active Member

    Nov 28, 2009
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    SI index reference
     
  8. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Don't you hate jokes you gotta explain..or should I say yotta.
     
  9. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Attoboy is faint praise indeed.
     
  10. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    Let us know if you see a multimeter using that prefix -- should be a pretty capable meter... :p
     
  11. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    If you could carry the shunt. It would probably weigh a good bit. and have a huge heat-sink.:D
     
  12. VoodooMojo

    Active Member

    Nov 28, 2009
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    sure, make fun of me, but remember:
    160,217.897 Coulombs is a yotta electrons:p
    nyuk, nyuk, nyuk....


    Let us know if you see a multimeter using that prefix -- should be a pretty capable meter... :p

    If you could carry the shunt. It would probably weigh a good bit. and have a huge heat-sink.:D
    __________________
    -rm-
     
  13. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    He said "THATS A YOTTA ELECTRONS!!!":D

    ---calm down, now, people---
     
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