Differential Equations

Discussion in 'Math' started by evo21, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. evo21

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 17, 2007
    5
    0
    hey,
    i have a big test coming up and i need to study something but i dont know how its called in english.

    its the inverse of differential, something that transforms the differential equation in the original equation, like:
    [cos(x)] = sen(x) or [1] = x

    and where can i find books talking about that?
     
  2. shankbond

    Active Member

    Nov 4, 2007
    53
    0
    i think u r either talking about
    differential equations or integration calculus
    so , search books mentioning the above said titles
     
  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,170
    1,797
    I can't make any sense of your request.

    My best guess is that you are talking about the Laplace Transform. It transforms a differential equation into an algebraic equation. Is that what you are talking about?
     
  4. evo21

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 17, 2007
    5
    0
    f'(cos x)= -sen x

    if i want to reverse it

    [-sen x] = cos x

    what is the name of that operation?
    in my country it is called primitivate, but i cant find anything with that name, so i was wondering what is the proper name in english..
     
  5. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    145
    The inverse of differentiation is integration - see the Fundamental Theorum of Calculus.

    What you have done in the above post is integrate the original differential function.

    Dave
     
  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,170
    1,797
    I see it now. What threw me was the use of the abreviation "sen" for the sine function. The "English" abreviation is sin, as in sin(x).

    Some textbooks also call the operation the anti-derivative, but I'm not sure the useage is widely accepted.

    You might find the table from the following article handy. Google and Wiki are your friends.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigonometric_function
     
  7. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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  8. evo21

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 17, 2007
    5
    0
    yeah thats it. in my school we first learn the anti-derivatives and only after we learn the integration, so i though they were different. my teacher uses a different notation for anti-derivatives that doesnt look like integration at all, hence the confusion.

    thanks for the answers =)
     
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