different between arduino and the clone one

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by bug13, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. bug13

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Feb 13, 2012
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    I would like to buy an arduino and motor shield to play around learn, (my final goal is to build two wheels self balancing small toy)

    just wondering what's different between arduino and the clone one (assembled in china base on the international open source something, can't remember the full name)

    the clone one is a lot cheaper. I think I should ask before buying one, as I am still student.

    Any advices, thoughts, ideas, suggestions are all well come.
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I would stick with the genuine article. A cloned one may work or it may not. The risk is probably not worth it.

    hgmjr
     
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  3. tw34kd

    New Member

    Jul 17, 2010
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    I'd say the best clone is the one you build yourself.
     
  4. scottyjr

    New Member

    Aug 12, 2011
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    bug13 likes this.
  5. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    The amazon deal spotted by scottjr seems to be a very reasonable one.

    hgmjr
     
  6. adrenalina

    Active Member

    Jan 4, 2011
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    If you read review you will notice that it is also a clone made to look like the original.
     
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  7. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I ordered one from newark, turns out is was a multi-comp clone. MC-nove. Worked just like my other arduino, no problems
     
  8. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    If it's "international open-source" can there be a "clone"? Aren't they all just Arduinos made by different manufacturers?

    I thought a "clone" was a non-licensed copy of a copyright product?

    With open-source they are all licensed, and anyone can make one.
     
  9. BSomer

    Member

    Dec 28, 2011
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    True, but they still call them "clones" for some reason.

    To be an official arduino compatible "clone" they must follow some basic design specifications. So I would say that, for the most part, any board out there that says it is an arduino "clone" or compatible is a safe buy. I actually have the arduino uno and another one called a boarduino.

    You could make your own as well. The schematics are out there to make a full blown copy or just a bare bones design.
     
  10. justtrying

    Active Member

    Mar 9, 2011
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    I agree with one comment on Amazon, at $30 uno is not that expensive (I'm a student too and am using it now in a project). The thing is that if you want to support the people behind the open source concept of Arduino who are constantly updating the library etc, you should buy the board from them or built your own since the specs are available. Do not give money to someone who does not deserve it.
     
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  11. jimkeith

    Active Member

    Oct 26, 2011
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    I only hope that Arduino does not start using undocumented features to mess with the competition. In the early days of DOS, Microsoft did some dirty tricks--from this came the expression: "DOS ain't done until LOTUS won't run"
     
  12. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Plain and simple...You get what you pay for...
    Cheap is cheap for a reason..

    Its the buy the cheapest one mentality that is ruining the world now.
     
  13. vpoko

    Member

    Jan 5, 2012
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    Being an open source project, I think they encourage cloning it, so I doubt they would go in that direction. That said, I second what others have said: build your own. It's not that the Arduino is a ripoff, but there are parts in it that you don't usually need if you're putting it into a project. Once it's programmed, for example, the USB port is no longer needed. I'm an absolute beginner and I had no trouble assembling my own using AVR chips and programming it with an AVRISP mkII ($40 to purchase). The only thing is if you want to use some of the higher end AVR chips (like the mega2560), then you don't have the option of building your own unless you're comfortable soldering surface mount parts since the uC doesn't come in in a through-hole package.
     
  14. K7GUH

    Member

    Jan 28, 2011
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    I bought a clone at Fry's, brand name OSEPP. Knowing almost nothing of what I was gettting into, I found OSEPP's tech support much easier to follow than arduino's. Tried to ask arduino tech support a question about their software and got the runaround. So far, I like OSEPP just fine.
     
  15. scottyjr

    New Member

    Aug 12, 2011
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    I bought one. Got it today. Next to my other Arduino purchased from Adafruit, comparing all the markings, I'd put my money on it being a genuine Arduino. - Scotty
     
  16. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    They're probably both made at the same factory in China, from the same film artwork, out of the same parts. :)

    If you get an open-source PCB product manufactured in Asia they will often run a few thousand extra boards for themselves and sell them on ebay. Open source allows them to do that.
     
  17. bug13

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Feb 13, 2012
    1,208
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    thanks everyone's inputs, I have a better understand between a genuine one and a clone one.

    I think I will choose the genuine one as I am still beginner and want to support the developer.
     
  18. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I believe you have made the best choice to go with an off-the-shelf design. Once you are comfortable with a genuine board, you will be in a position to tackle your own clone if that is still a goal you wish to pursue.

    hgmjr
     
  19. RayB

    New Member

    Apr 3, 2011
    4
    1
    Second this... I got mine last Friday from Sparkfun and paid $10 too much because I did not think to check Amazon. I had a bunch of other things coming from Sparkfun, so the Arduino was a last minute decision. Probably not too badly hurt since the Amazon reseller would have charged $3 shipping fee.

    Ray

    Note: The Sparkfun unit came with the long-ish little folded pamphlet stating 'made in Italy...' and thanking you for purchasing a 'green' Zero Impact product.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2012
  20. hspalm

    Active Member

    Feb 17, 2010
    201
    8
    I'd say the amazon one is a fake/clone, considering the real UNO has a recommended retail price of roughly $25, and it's missing the "made in italy" marking. It could be an earlier version over-stock though, I'm not an expert on identifying arduinos, I just know there are LOTS of clones out there claiming to be the real thing.
     
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