Difference between EEPROM and FLASH

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Tabur, Dec 20, 2013.

  1. Tabur

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2012
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    Hello!

    I've never used Flash memory directly (without a specific controller/driver), so I don't know much about it. In practice, what's the difference between Flash and EEPROM? I know flash memories are usually bigger than EEPROMs, but besides that, whats different?

    I'm designing a product where I need to store around 1 MBytes of data from time to time, and I've only used EEPROMs thus far, so I'm thinking about working with flash memories.

    Thanks!
     
  2. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    See first three paragraphs here...
    http://en.wikipedia.org
     
  3. Tabur

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2012
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    But the thing is, that's not right. Most EEPROMs nowadays have byte write/byte erase capabilities.

    What's the practical difference between both?
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  5. Tabur

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2012
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    Ty bertus!!! Nice documents!
    Although I was looking more for a 2 phrase explanation. I think one of the biggest differences is that most flash run at 2.7v while eeproms at 5v, and flash tend to be bigger
     
  6. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    It's just branding. The general public can say "flash", even the stupid ones.
     
  7. cabraham

    Member

    Oct 29, 2011
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    EEPROM is byte erasable. Each address bit can be erased and reprogrammed independently. Flash is block erasable. Sections called blocks must be bulk erased then reprogrammed. Some flash parts have "boot blocks" where some blocks are smaller than the rest. This allows a small section to be erased and rewritten. Other parts have uniform blocks, all equal.

    Flash writes faster, typically in usec. But EE write time is typically msec. Big speed difference, hence the name "flash". I've worked with both for decades and these are my off the cuff comparisons.

    Claude
     
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