Detox Foot Bath DC Wiring Project Need Help

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by cahoca, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. cahoca

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
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    I am so glad I found this forum! I am not even considered a novice in electricity. In fact it scares me to death. Plumbing? Now I can handle that.

    I have instructions for building a detox foot bath listed below using batteries and I'd like to use a AC DC power converter instead to do the same thing. I want to be sure that I wire it properly so that when I put my feet in the water there is no chance of shock. Here are the instructions I have started with-
    Making the Bath
    • You will need are two 9-volt batteries; three 2-foot long lengths of wire, two alligator clips, two stainless steel spoons (or silverware), two basins (large enough each to put one of your foot in, along with water
    ), and plumbers/electrical tape. To prepare yourself, tape one spoon to one of the lengths of wire with your plumber's tape. Do the same with the other spoon with another wire. On the opposite end of each of the wires, tape an alligator clip. Make sure that the metal of the alligator clip is connected/touching the metal of the wire, and the same for the spoon and the wire. This won't work if the metals don't touch and create a current. Connect the alligator clamp of one of your wires to the positive connection of your battery, and the other alligator clip to the negative connection of your other battery. Use the third wire to connect the remaining two terminals together--one battery's positive, and the other's negative. After this, create your detox solution. END

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    I tried to look up what a 9v battery would put out in mA and I came up with 500mA. I now have two standard AC adapters that I hope to use- 1. Radio Shack Model A30950 AC adapter Class 2 transformer input 120VAC 60Hz 10W, output 9VDC 500mA, 2. AC Power Adapter Input AC120V 60Hz 8W Output DC9V 500mA "plug In Power Supply for use with Sony Telephone Equip" Model AC-T10. I know they show different AC wattage but figured if the output is what I need it would be okay
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    Can I just use the positive and negative wires and attach to the spoons and then plug it in? Is there a chance of getting shocked? Is there a better way to do this?

    Thanks very much for reading this. I am trying my best to do this right but have not got anyone to ask that knows about this. Chuck
     
  2. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    3,577
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    1. Radio Shack Model A30950 AC adapter Class 2 transformer input 120VAC 60Hz 10W, output 9VDC 500mA, 2. AC Power Adapter Input AC120V 60Hz 8W Output DC9V 500mA "plug In Power Supply for use with Sony Telephone Equip" Model AC-T10.

    The consideration that this would make any difference is really much of a stretch.

    for use with Sony Telephone Equip

    Is it a telephone, after all?

    The instructions for your detox foot bath might be bogus.

    Best would be something crank powered. So if you get an electric shock, the crank stops turning- and you are safe!
     
  3. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
    1,425
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    Is this supposed to be some kind of iontophoresis device?
     
  4. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    What is wrong with your feet that causes them to be TOXIC? Snake bites?
    Why do you think the instructions for detoxing your feet from a QUACK will do any good?

    Why do you think that shorting a 9V battery will detox anything? Doesn't the battery get hot?
    Don't short a cheap Chinese wall wart because then it might catch on fire.

    A new 9V alkaline battery can supply maybe 1A for a few seconds. The datasheet shows that it can supply 400mA to a proper load (not a short circuit) for 15 minutes then its voltage has dropped to less than 7V and it is almost dead.
     
  5. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    Putting your feet into a tub of electrolyte that is connected to a wall-powered voltage source is very risky. Personally, I would only do it if a ground fault circuit interrupter were placed between the power supply and the wall outlet.

    Give it a try with 9 volt batteries and if it seems to work, then get a ground fault interrupter extension cord and use the wall wart.
     
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  6. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Use rechargeable ni-cad 9V batteries. They're not cheap but can deliver higher current than "normal" 9V batteries, and they will allow you to forget about hooking into the wall.

    That's a really bad idea, IMHO. An isolating transformer SHOULD normally be safe, and the GFI extension cord SHOULD also protect you, but the safety margins are thin and the downside risk is death. Things happen; kids run by, pets play, spouses open doors unexpectedly, the phone rings just as a lightbulb burns out causing you to trip over your foot bath and spill electrolyte onto the extension cord. On and on, too many ways to end up dead.
     
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  7. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    Are we going to read about this on the Darwin Awards?
     
  8. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    People have been applying odd things - electricity, magnetic fields, radioactivity, known toxins, on and on - to themselves for an awfully long time and I guess it says a lot about the robustness of our evolution that we seem to mostly get away with it.

    I can just picture the trial/final run. As they say around here, "Hold my beer and watch this!"
     
  9. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    quack :D :D :D
     
  10. cahoca

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
    3
    0
    Thanks for a sensible reply. I wondered if that would help
     
  11. cahoca

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2012
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    I have not seen that word used but it is using negative and positive ions. I currently am using this model on ebay 190755674638 from seller maxdetox and it's seems to be helping with the pain my wife has from arthritis but too early to tell. We picked this unit and seller because he has sold over 4000 units and has 99.7% good feedback which is outstanding. We have asked all the hard questions regarding scam info shown on input and he answered to our satisfactions and knows what he is doing. There are a lot of controversial things about it and have done a lot of research. Hope that helps. Will try all ways to relieve wifes' pain. MD's only treat pain with drugs and offer no long term treatment
     
  12. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    What was your question?

    "Is this a scam"?

    Seller: "No"

    You: "OK good enough for me".

    I'd suggest you get some independent study to review from a reputable source.

    Really sorry about your wife but no sense spending money on magic beans.

    Believe me, I saw this with a co-worker that plopped down $30K to try to save his wife from cancer. What ever that Mexican scam was that was running back in the 90s. What was that avocado extract or something?
     
  13. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    To the degree that it seems to be helping your wife, it is almost certainly the placebo effect. Now, even if it is, if you wife feels better (and is being put at risk by the "treatment" and not foregoing real treatment as a consequence), then it is a net gain. What you can do is use the thing you have but do something so that it isn't actually working (but that your wife can't tell that it isn't) and see if it continues to seem to help. If so, the you have your answer and keep using the fake and don't let her catch on.
     
  14. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    Maybe you buy old fashioned carbon-zinc Chinese "ordinary" 9V batteries at The Dollar Store.

    The datasheets from Energizer show that their 625mAh 9V alkaline battery is much better than their obsolete 120mAh Ni-Cad "9V" battery. Their 175mAh Ni-MH "9V" battery is better than their Ni-Cad one but the alkaline battery is better.
     
  15. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Oops, yes, the memory I had in my head was 40 years old and was AA nicads, not a 9V. A pack of nicad AAs can turn a wire into a bright filament. Learned that the hard way.

    But anyway my point to the OP was to use batteries to avoid any connection to the wall, and thereby gain a big safety factor. If short battery life is impractical, rechargeable batteries is an option.

    I would also suggest the OP look into TENS, a well-known and documented safe way to deliver a therapeutic electric field with much less fuss and muss.
     
  16. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
    2,651
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    Back to safety for a moment: Your foot bath will have to be conductive in order to get ions to flow between your spoons (if you use silver, then you will have silver ions in the water which is a pretty good antibiotic), and dipping your feet into a conductive solution would make it easy to get a dangerous (potentially lethal) current through your body. I strongly suggest that you limit the current to about 20 milliamps, which can be done by placing 50 ohms in series with the battery for each volt, hence a 18v battery would have a 910 resistor in series with it.
     
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