Desktop or Laptop

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by tshuck, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. tshuck

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    So, my primary HP laptop just died. From the error code I'm getting, the CPU has failed-I understand this may mean the motherboard has died. Either way, I need a new computer. (I'm just glad my hard drive is fine! :))

    The question is whether or not I should get a desktop. I could use the extra processing power of a desktop, but I do enjoy the mobility of a laptop. What I'm thinking I might do is get the desktop and use TeamViewer to remote into the desktop from a lightweight Linux laptop if ever I need mobility. Has anyone done this and was it effective?

    Your thoughts?
     
  2. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    I'd say go for a laptop only if you need it, ie. work both from home and the office. Otherwise, it will be just an excuse for you and others to make you work during transits and home, whereas you should be enjoying yourself.
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Why 'A new computer'?
    Pick up a New, say Asus MB from a local PC parts store and you are up and running?
    The only thing is if your MB is older, you may have older H.D. interface, all the new boards are Sata.
    I assume your Case, P.S., Mouse, K.B. etc is OK?
    If you want a bit of portability, also pick up a IBM Note Book or a Dell off ebay for < $100.00..
    This is an electronics site, for pete's sake! :D
    Max.
     
  4. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Like all electronics and other things ... the cost to repair can make it uneconomical to repair, when you consider the "upgrades" you would get with a newer machine and the warranty.
     
  5. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    I would say get a laptop, especially as you had a laptop.

    Monitor, keyboard, mouse, etc all together, you're familiar with that too.

    If you need the portability, great, it's there, but if you don't, just set it up on your table. Plus the bonus that it takes up about 90% less space.

    You might loose some performance compared to a desktop - but how much would that affect how you use it?

    Sparky
     
  6. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    I don't know of many who went from desktop to laptop returning to desktop, unless it was the only way to satisfied a very specific need.

    I went from desktop to laptop and have no intentions of returning to desktop.
     
  7. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    Laptops are convenient, but do not work as well as desktop machines. If you really need the mobility, then by all means get a laptop. Otherwise, a desktop is the way to go. Swapping out the motherboard and processor will likely cost you (depending on the quality) between $200 and $500, which might be a bit much. On the other hand, it will last you much longer than a new laptop will. In my experience, laptops generally have a lifespan of 1.5-3 years, whereas desktops have a lifespan of 4-8 years.

    Just my $0.02.

    Regards,
    Matt
     
  8. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Frankly I don't understand the mentality to go out and buy 'new' if one is at all electronically literate, it is a very simple task to repair/upgrade, and probably with a superior MB (Asus is my favorite) $100 - $160, and processor than one would get a Desktop in some on sale deal.
    I have done this from the days of the 286.
    Equip yourself with a backup program such as Acronis, and make regular backups, then if you have to transfer to another H.D. format, it is a breeze to load a new HD if you have to.
    I have three (ebay) laptops I use for different situations and I never paid more than ~$100 for any one of them (IBM and DELL) .
    Not worth fixing these, I just replace them.
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
  9. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Some decisions are also based on time. How long does it take one to get an ebay item shipped, how long to perform the upgrade, and certainly how long to reinstall the software (and upgrades) when you make a replacement? All constitutes part of the downtime and the perceived value of your time. If your time is worth nothing, do you feel bad if you charge someone for doing repair services?

    Of course if you can live without your computer for that amount of time, it's a better way to go than buy new. How many out there have multiple machines to fall back upon while their main machine is getting repaired? The computer is a tool, just like all the other tools in your toolbox. If your DMM were defective (not a blown fuse or batteries), would you repair it? After all, using the meter indicates someone is "at all electronically literate."

    I've bought used laptops from ebay before. Some were good deals and some were not. I got burned on one that was "as is" and the person who sold it stated it booted up to the post screen, they lied as it didn't. It was a sister to my older 17 inch laptop, a few of CPU generations ago. When my grandson "dropped" it, the audio jacks and traces were ripped from the mother board. It was probably six years old at that time and I made the decision to move onward. It was past the lifespan for tax purposes, so it serves as a backup now, something the kids can play with and if they screw it up ... no big deal. I have a couple of laptops for just that purpose.

    There are various reasons to upgrade or buy ... even if you were electronically literate.
     
  10. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I am talking about an existing Desk top computer, agreed if you buy new it could be more expedient, but what about fitting/transferring your Existing HD and all the programs and files?
    Typically it is no longer than fitting a brand new MB.
    Also what do you do with your old unit? end up as scrap?
    Restoring/upgrading it is keeping components out of the land fill.
    I visit a local re-cycle'r regularly for obsolete parts, and amazed at some of the high end items that end up being scrapped, often government dept's automatic replacing systems at end of budget year etc!.
    Max.
     
  11. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Yep, another thing you have in common with the neighbors to the South ... the government's use it or lose it attitude towards fiscal spending.
     
  12. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
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    Laptop:

    • Mobile
    • Compact
    • Work/use nearly everywhere
    • Batteryoperated in case of loss of mains
    Desktop:

    • Better monitor (Yes you can on a laptop too, but still...)
    • Better keyboard (Yes, I know. External keyboard on laptop....)
    • More USB/Gadget options
    • Easier to upgrade


    I'd go for a desktop to do the hard work, and a Samsung pad do bring along for newspapers and e-mails.
     
  13. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
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    I have a couple of desktops kicking around for only one reason, legacy. Otherwise they'd be gone.
     
    #12 likes this.
  14. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    I would also say that desktop pack much more power and punch. I would never do say ECAD work on a flimsy laptop
     
    spark8217 likes this.
  15. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    Don't forget Desktops last 4 times as long! :p

    Absolutely right. I could never use my laptop for programs like Solidworks, Adobe CS6, etc. It just doesn't have the power to handle it, and it's a fairly decent mid-to-high range one.

    Matt
     
  16. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    My work takes me out in the field to occasionally do warranty work, and some of the equipment is dated as to the means of communication.
    So at different times I may need RS232, Parallel, PCMCI, Floppy disk drive, Ethernet, DVD ROM.
    The IBM Think Pad has all of them.
    The highest level program I otherwise use on a L.T. is AutoCad and MPLAB.
    Max.
     
  17. tshuck

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    All valid points I've been trying to weigh.

    My work is not mobile and I do some 3D modelling on occasion. I do research with 25+ tabs in Chrome and will leave a program running for days to let me know what I was working on last.

    I want dual 23" displays and am now seriously considering making it happen, which puts the laptop at a disadvantage since it increases the number of cables to remove before it can be taken along.

    For the times I do want to go mobile, I can use my older laptop to remote into the desktop, which also unloads the processing from the laptop to the desktop, all I would need is an internet connection-which I almost always am near.

    I don't enjoy the occasional overheating that laptops are prone to and a lack of free time makes opening up the laptop(not to mention warranty issues) to clear the vents and whatnot an undesired task.

    I am leaning toward the desktop, but knowing me, I'll be on the fence for the next week until I decide I can't stand looking at AAC from my phone anymore...
     
  18. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I have a docking station for my DELL's, allows a K.B. Mouse Monitor etc to stay connected.
    Just lift and go!.
    Max.
     
  19. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    Dual screens are a blessing. They will rock your world! I'm never going back to single screen for my desktop.

    I think your post is pretty conclusive on your final choice.
     
  20. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Never buy a second hand laptop. By the time you have replaced the almost dead battery and the hard drive with bad sectors and reinstalled everything, it's cheaper and easier to buy a new one.
     
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