DC Power supply

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by unclebust, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    I am trying to find a dc power supply to use with a power strip that will maintain a constant voltage at all outlets. Want to use it to power multiple village pieces, mostly 6 volt/500-1000 ma. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    How about something like this. You would need to obtain an AC to DC power supply that could handle the total power requirements of your display.

    hgmjr
     
  3. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    Thank you, does it have to be a/c to dc? If I can get a DC supply to supply the voltage ness. I am guessing the total draw of all the pieces is about 10 amps. I have the power strip, with built in volt meter and 8 outputs.
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I think I may have jumped the gun. You are looking for a DC power supply to connect up to a power strip that you already have.

    I am assuming that you plan to plug this DC power supply into an AC wall outlet hence my reference to an AC to DC power supply.

    Can you provide the model number of the power strip and the manufacturer of the terminal strip? I may be able to find a data sheet online so that I can see the item firsthand.

    hgmjr
     
  5. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    I guess I was not paying attention, of course it would be a/c to d/c. If the power needed is about 10 amps, and I can get a 10 amp supply, would it work? Will there be any voltage drop as I plug in each piece?
     
  6. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    Thank you, the model is MFJ-1116 - Universal radio Inc.
     
  7. cheddy

    Active Member

    Oct 19, 2007
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    No, as long as they are parallel to the voltage source they will all have the same voltage across them.
     
  8. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    A quality power supply that is rated to provide at least 60 Watts (6V times 10A) should be able to power the 10A load with no appreciable drop in voltage at full load. You may be better served by getting a 75 to 100 Watt 6V power supply just to provide a bit of margin.

    I think that an SMPS (switching mode power supply) is your best value. I think the price per watt is in the 1 to 2 dollar range. Have you pick out a candidate supply as yet?

    I would still be interested in knowing more about the power strip you have already purchased.

    hgmjr
     
  9. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I was able to find the manufacturer's website and see the power strip. It looks like a reasonable method of distributing the DC voltage to your multiple loads.

    hgmjr
     
  10. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    Thank you for your help, I am going with the better supply. Help was much appreciated.
     
  11. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    RE: power supply, will this be good? • Input: 115V AC, 60Hz, 500 watts, output: 6~15V DC (adjustable)
    • 22 Amp constant, 25 Amp surge
     
  12. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    It should prove more than adequate. You will definitely want to introduce some circuit protection measures since the output from this supply can easily take out all of the bulbs in your display in one brilliant flash of light.

    I will take another look at your power distribution strip specification to see what fusing provisions it provides.

    ....Later.....

    OK, I took another look at the power distribution strip it does include a 15A fuse. That may be a bit high under for your application. You indicated that you were expecting a maximum load of 10 amps. With that figure in mind you may want to consider replacing the 15A fuse with a 12A fuse perhaps. It is better to have a fuse blow and need replacing with a good one than risk blowing out the lamps in your village.

    Even better would be to add a 1.5 fuse in line with each of the outputs from the 8 power terminals on the strip. It is usually easier to select the correct size fuse when it is close to the individual load you want to protect.

    These are just a few suggestions you may want to consider. You don't want to have to change all of the bulbs in your village because the power supply adjustment accidentally got set to its maximum output.


    hgmjr
     
  13. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    Thanks hgmjr, I believe the strip has a 15 amp fuse, do you think I should install a lower amp fuse to be safe?
     
  14. unclebust

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 31, 2007
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    Thank you again for the great advice, I will add a fuse for each circut just to be safe. I wont be hooking this up till Xmas. I will share my experience to all when it is completed. Just want to do away with all the power paks LOL.
     
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