DC power from phone battery charger

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by sasarchiver, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. sasarchiver

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 26, 2011
    4
    0
    i got a spare phone battery and stand alone battery charger for ny samsung ace. the power is:
    USB OUTPUT - 5.2VDC 800MA
    OR
    DC 4.2V 350MA ±50MA

    IS THIS USEABLE FOR MULTI LED CIRCUITS?
    IM A NEWBIE BTW GETTING INTO IT :) JUST GOT AN ARDUINO UNO TOO :)
     
  2. CraigHB

    Member

    Aug 12, 2011
    127
    15
    If they're not lighting LED's (use a lot of power), it should work fine. When I first started breadboarding electronics, I used a 5V wall wart for my power supply. You can also use an old desktop computer power supply which has 3.3, 5, and 12V taps. You can get a basic DC power supply pretty cheap though, like this.
     
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,298
    6,810
    In simpler terms, yes.
     
  4. Mike33

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 4, 2005
    349
    25
    Yes, you could play with that...maybe save it for something you build that it would "fit" well....as Craig said, try to find an old computer power supply with several taps.

    You can then set it up as a workbench supply (until you get the urge to BUILD one!), and likely can work it up to give 12V, 9V, and the necessary 5V, with regulation. Many also offer split supplies, so you can have +12v and -12V, as well! Look into a supply with a regulator, like a LM317 and a good 24V transformer if you want something *really good* for the workbench.

    This is great for testing and designing.....then, if you find something that needs , oh, maybe 5v at 100mA, you might be able to use the phone supply (I'd guess the lower the current draw, the higher the voltage - test this, it's a good 'understanding' exercise! It should give 4.2v AT +/- 350mA, and higher if you draw less...). Remember to determine wattage (Voltage X Current in A) before you start hooking up resistors ;)

    I save all the walwarts that come my way, and tailor them for projects that I'll make permanent. Often requires placing a regulator on the board, maybe just a zener or a dedicated one.....sometimes they're just "plug and play"! They're worth keeping and experimenting with.
     
  5. lxtbattery

    New Member

    Oct 16, 2011
    1
    0
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