DC High Voltage Source with small size

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by pretty_fly, Aug 11, 2016.

  1. pretty_fly

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 2, 2015
    18
    0
    Hi guys

    I want to build a high voltage source it should be around 40kV (several Volt ripple pot. is perfect) ~100um current. These are not exact values but the important point is how to build it in a smaller size?? We have build one for a school project with my adviser. It was around ~10kV with ~10V ripple. So I have some ideas how to generate such a high voltage but they need generally very big size transformer, capacitors etc. using a cascade multiplier circuit. I saw a product of amptek generating 50kV for an X-ray radiation source and it is very small (2.5cm x 5cm x 15cm including the x-ray tube! ). How this can be achieved? I mean do they use a different method instead of voltage multiplier? And what type of components do they use to put them into such a small size box?

    Here it is:
    http://amptek.com/products/mini-x-ray-tube/#4

    My question is especially about keeping the size small ...

    thanks in advance!
     
  2. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,766
    928
    Get a hand held taser and scavenge the circuitry. That will be the smallest and most compact you will find without a corporate spending account.
     
    BR-549 likes this.
  3. pretty_fly

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 2, 2015
    18
    0
    Well you probably talking about the the thing used for flies. I looked at them but they are not very stable and still not comparable with the given example. Hope there will be more ideas...
     
  4. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
    8,740
    759
    Taser.
    Not a fly zapper.
     
  5. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,515
    1,246
    What is this for, how much current must the supply supply, etc.?

    ak
     
  6. pretty_fly

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 2, 2015
    18
    0
    This is for a laboratory project producing a strong electric field. Above I've given some values for power rating.
     
  7. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,515
    1,246
    In post #1 it says "~100um current." um is the abbreviation for micrometers. Did you mean uA?

    ak
     
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