datasheets and part numbers of electronic components

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by PG1995, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. PG1995

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 15, 2011
    753
    5
    Hi

    I was learning about the datasheets and part numbers of electronic components. An an example you can have a look on the datasheet of 1N4001-1N4007 (part numbers) diode here.

    1: Is this possible that the datasheet of one manufacturer for, say, 1N4001 could differ from the other?

    2: Do the diode families differ by their ampere rating? At least it looks like this from this table. The family 1N400x and the family 1N540x operate at 1A and 3A respectively; and the members of the same family operate at different voltages.

    3: Could you please list some manufactures which are most popular for making electronic components? I believe Fairchild is one of them.

    I'm very much grateful for your help and time.

    Regards
    PG
     
  2. praondevou

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 9, 2011
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    Yes, there may be slight differences, depending on the component. (maybe not for this particular diode)

    Not necessarily, you may have different families with the same ampere rating. They'll differ in other parameters.


    Onsemi, Fairchild, Motorola, Philips (NXP), Texas Instruments, International Rectifier...

    you'll find a lot of them HERE
     
    PG1995 likes this.
  3. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,648
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    Hello,

    A lot of links to manufacturers and datasheetbanks can be found on this page of teh EDUCYPEDIA:
    Datasheets

    Bertus
     
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  4. PG1995

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 15, 2011
    753
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    Hi, again, :)

    Please help me with the queries below. And I would request you to keep you replies simple. Thank you.

    1: I believe the most important common parameter in the 7400 series is that it uses TTL. Please correct me.

    2: I was reading Wikipedia article about pinout which I couldn't understand. Could you please put in simple and short words?

    3: The following is from a Wikipedia article. My question is about the red part. I don't know what temperature has to do with the designation "74". In my humble opinion it should simply identify that it belongs to 7400 series. But perhaps 7400 series in itself has something to do with the temperature.

    4: I have seen some 7400 series ICs such as 74LS00 with 14 pins. Are the number of pins always "14". I don't think so.

    5: I think 7400 series implements different kinds of technologies used to manufacture transistors used in the ICs such as bipolar, MOSFET, etc. I think the one I saw on the net used bipolar technology because it used the label "Vcc".

    Thank you very much for helping me with the queries above.

    Regards
    PG
     
  5. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,648
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    Hello,

    The 7400 series are all TTL chips.
    The 4000 series are all Cmos chips, they are slower, but consume less power.

    For the pinouts, take a look at the following page:
    http://www.kingswood-consulting.co.uk/giicm/

    It contains a list of pages with ascii drawings of the pinouts of a lot of IC's.

    As for the number of pins, many have 14 or 16 pins, there are also chips with more pins like the 74181 wich has 24 pins.

    Bertus
     
  6. Veracohr

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2011
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    I don't really have historical knowledge myself, but here's what I gathered reading the Wikipedia article you linked:

    It says the 7400 series was originally all TTL, so this was once correct, but it also states there are now CMOS versions that retain the same part numbers for the sake of continuity.

    Pinout means which pins on the physical IC package correspond to which points in the circuit, such as inputs, outputs, clock input, etc.

    Components used in military applications are usually required to be more resistant to temperature extremes, vibrations, etc. Parts that start with "74" are the common consumer versions; those that start with "54" are the military versions with extended range of operating temperature. Therefore the 7408 AND gate and a 5408 AND gate do the same thing, but the 5408 is rated for use in military applications (I don't know if a 5408 actually exists, but it illustrates the point).

    Nope, it depends on the type and number of circuits in a single IC. A single OR gate won't have as many pins as a quad OR gate.

    I'm not sure on this one, but I think that's correct.

    Why does the forum keep changing my quoting structure?
     
  7. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    The 54XX series is named military grade for a reason. It has higher durability standards than the simple 74XX series.

    Typically, for example, the 7400 can operate up to 70^{oC}, while its 5400 counterpart can operate up to 125^{oC}.
     
  8. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    While the 54xx series has a wider temperature range, the specifications for Vcc are 4.75v to 5.25v instead of 4.5v to 5.5v like the 74xx, and the allowed I/O current is decreased.
     
  9. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
    2,147
    300
    I seem to remember some suggestion that you have something other than English as your first language. If so,please note that for many Wikipedia articles, selecting another language option while reading article may take you to a version in the new selected language, if one exists.

    This example was found by selecting the French option from the article you are referring to. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boîtier_de_circuit_intégré#Brochage

    Edit: Sometimes this works: http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Цоколёвка
    Sometimes it doesn't: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Comunicato_4_ottobre_2011

    Apparently there is a major row going on! http://www.businessinsider.com/italy-wikipedia-wiretapping-2011-10

    I hope that helps. By the way, which is your L1?
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2011
  10. PG1995

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 15, 2011
    753
    5
    Thank you very much, Bertus, Veracohr, GeoRacer, Sgt., Adjuster.

    @Adjuster: Thank you for letting me know this. I would definitely use the local language feature whenever it's available. Seriously, I don't know even know what that "L1" is. I have also googled it and checked my previous post to see it I have used "L1" anywhere. Please let me know what it is, then I would tell you!:)

    Best wishes
    PG
     
  11. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
    2,147
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