Current Booster

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by solanki001, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. solanki001

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2008
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    Hi I have 12 V 600 mA input and I need 12 V 1.5 A output. Could you please suggest me any circuit?

    Thanks,

    Ashish Solanki
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    That is not very likely. You really need another voltage source for the extra current.
     
  3. russ_hensel

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 11, 2009
    818
    47
    A cap. could do it if you need the current for just a short time. ( and actually at a bit less than 12 v ) A good 12v battery would do nicely. Remember conservation of energy.
     
  4. solanki001

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2008
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    0
  5. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,649
    2,348
    Hello,

    What will supply the "booster"?
    If you want 1.5A output, you will need 1.5A input.

    Bertus
     
  6. solanki001

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2008
    4
    0
    supply is 12 V 600 mA.
     
  7. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,649
    2,348
    Hello,

    If the input is 12 Volts, 600 mA, the output will NEVER be more than this 600 mA.
    You can NOT get energy from nothing.

    Bertus
     
  8. solanki001

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2008
    4
    0
    Ok... I understand that I cannot creat energy. But can I store the energy and then I can get 12 V, 1.2 A. Is it possible by any means??
     
  9. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,649
    2,348
    Hello,

    You can charge a battery with the 600 mA power source for time X.
    Then you can draw 1.2 A for a little less than 1/2 of this time X from this battery.

    Bertus
     
  10. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
    214
    Using a large capacitor MAY work...

    For example a 10,000µF capacitor.

    However, those capacitors are also very physically large.

    Consider using a supercapacitor.

    These can be rated up to 20 farads(!!) in a package not much bigger than the 10,000µF, but the disadvantage is they are usually only rated for 2.5V or 5.5V so you will have to connect multiple ones in series.

    Due to conservation of energy, you cannot get more energy out than in.

    You can however do some calculations.

    12V, 600mA, 1 second = 7.2 watt-seconds.

    12V, 6A, 0.1 seconds = 7.2 watt-seconds.

    So to meet the maximum energy output of 7.2 watt-seconds, at 1.5A, you can only go for 0.5 seconds, approximately...

    (EDIT: of course, this doesn't take into account the rating of the power supply. It may well fail/trip from taking 6A, you will need a capacitor to smooth the output.)
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2010
  11. Potato Pudding

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 11, 2010
    684
    92
    It may be perfectly simple and easily done as long as you only need a low duty cycle.

    If you only need to pulse the output for a fraction of a second every two or three seconds it will be fine with some large capacitors.

    If you need 15 minutes of output every hour then a 12 Volt storage cell can be used.

    If you need a continuous 12V 1.5A output then you need that much input.

    It is that simple.

    Power In >= Power Out
     
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