Current Alarm with Shut-Off

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by My Tech Guy, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. My Tech Guy

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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    I would like to plug my woodworking router into a circuit that would monitor the amperage of the router motor. If the router is accidentally stalled (for any reason) and the amperage goes above a set point (1 to 7 amps) then the power to the router will be shut off.

    What would be the easiest way to build a circuit like this? Are there any devices on the market that I would be able to use like this? I have seen industrial versions of this, but not low amperage 120 volt versions. Thanks in advance for any information about this circuit.
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

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    Jul 18, 2013
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  3. My Tech Guy

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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  4. MaxHeadRoom

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    On the link if you go to Sensors> current sensors you will see the CSDA series, you can select a set point operation or a analogue output option type if you wish.
    You would need to interface it to some kind of μp if you want say a digital display, if just a set point switch off, then it could be done with simple logic etc.
    Max.
     
  5. TheButtonThief

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    Feb 26, 2011
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  6. My Tech Guy

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    Feb 18, 2009
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  7. MaxHeadRoom

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    Did you read the FB comment?
    "Yet another Chinese product with no documentation, 3 trimmer pots on board, wonder what their purpose is???"
    Max.
     
  8. My Tech Guy

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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    Yes I did see that. Was searching for a manual but no joy. I also looked at your Honeywell suggestion and TheButtonThiefs suggestion but I've never used anything like that, and without a detailed schematic or more detailed information I couldn't use them, especially since they are around $150.00 - $200.00 a pop. I thought finding something would be much more straight forward. Guess I'll just keep looking. Thanks for trying.
     
  9. MaxHeadRoom

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    Where was that? The one's I use are around $40-$50?
    Max.
     
  10. My Tech Guy

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    Feb 18, 2009
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  11. MaxHeadRoom

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    I thought you were referring to the Honeywell CSDA devices.
    Max.
     
  12. TheButtonThief

    Active Member

    Feb 26, 2011
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    Really simple:
    Motor Overload.jpg
     
  13. MaxHeadRoom

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    You can also run the N through on of the blocks, the O/L drops out all conductors when tripped.
    Max.
     
  14. My Tech Guy

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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    Looking at one of these PKE32s I don't see a way to mount it in a case.

    Is this going to be a issue? I thought I saw in one of the manuals for it that it slides on some rails in the back.

    How do you guys mount these in a case?

    BTW, you guys have been great with all of your help. Really appreciate it!
     
  15. AnalogKid

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    Aug 1, 2013
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  16. My Tech Guy

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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  17. TheButtonThief

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    Feb 26, 2011
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    This type of breaker mounts to a TS35 DIN rail, the same type of DIN rail that's found in a domestic consumer unit that the MCB's mount to. In fact, the PKE32 has the same profile as an MCB (as you can see in the image below) so will also fit into a consumer unit but you'll generally find them on bigger electrical panels.

    destacker (4).jpg
     
  18. My Tech Guy

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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    Last edited: Jul 11, 2016
  19. MaxHeadRoom

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    Generally the smallest length of DIN rail I have purchased was 1m long, they can usually be had at any local electrical supply house catering to contractors etc.
    The Amazon link also looks like the right item.
    Max.
     
  20. TheButtonThief

    Active Member

    Feb 26, 2011
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    Yes indeed you can (the one you've linked looks like one of the better quality ones) and yes indeed you would, especially if there are airborne particles or if your machinery is outside. You can buy IP45 rated terminal boxes of various sizes which have receiver holes for mounting DIN rail inside. Generally, if you're mounting a breaker of some sort into one of these boxes (instead of just terminals), then it's best to go for one with a transparent cover so as to see if anything has tripped without having to unscrew the cover.
     
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