Cure for cancer

Discussion in 'General Science' started by amilton542, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. amilton542

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    I am a firm believer in that ANY process can be reversed. I also feel that the 100% cure for cancer rests on the pillars of electromagnetism.

    Is this possible?
     
  2. StayatHomeElectronics

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    Sep 25, 2008
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  3. wmodavis

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    Possible and likely are very different.
    I certainly would not propose that it is impossible.
    I would suggest that IMO whatever that is worth, it is highly unlikely. In fact some suggest electric fields & electromagnetic fields cause cancer and other maladies. And there are processes in chemistry that are irreversible so your hypothesis or belief "that ANY process can be reversed" is certainly refutable.
    But you would do the world a great favor if you discover how to do it.

    And if I still had cancer I would be depressed so find a way.
     
  4. debjit625

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    Apr 17, 2010
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    If I had any idea of this then I wouldn’t be posting this rather enjoying my fame...

    Cancer can be treated if diagnosed at earlier stage its kind of chronic disease...

    And yes I believe that one day we will have 100% cure for any kind of cancer. Probably or may be DNA switching process will be the cure, if we can control DNA of a cell then we can control the cell too.I don't have any idea how the DNA will be switched but electromagnetism could be used,as many believe that cosmic rays cause changes in DNA .

    I know God is with us and one day we will crack it.

    Yes may be for a certain time, remember nothing is impossible it is quite possible in near future those processes in chemistry could be reversed.People are working on them.

    Good Luck
     
  5. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Is what possible? That you firmly believe that any process can be reversed and that you feel that the complete cure for cancer rests on the pillars of electromagnetism? Sure, I guess that's possible. ;)


    If doubt we will ever have "a" cure for all cancers. The term "cancer" is a catchall term and many forms of cancer have nothing fundamental to do with each other. We already have the ability to cure many types of cancer with a very high success rate and treatments that work wonderfully on one type of cancer have little to no effect (or even a harmful effect) on others. So we are going to end up dealing with groups of cancers on an individual basis, albeit using what we learn from other forms (and other, completely unrelated, areas of research).

    I don't believe this is possible and use, as a counterexample, the process of combustion. If I gave someone in the future a tank containing a bunch of water, carbon dioxide, and a mishmash of other chemical residues, I seriously doubt they would be able to reverse the process and produce the log, chunk of coal, and pint of gasoline that was originally burned.
     
  6. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    Perhaps, but you are mixing analogies. DNA replicates, very precisely. Given time, regeneration will be possible. Of course, you and I will be safely dead of old age when this might happen, but the chance is there.

    There are also new technologies being invented all the time. Nanotech may someday reach the level of regeneration. I put that even further in the future though.
     
  7. amilton542

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    I don't believe it, I've done it again. Yes, it would be nice to see that tank of fuel my car burned-off transposed back in to a ready-to-use form again :eek:

    Anyway, I've found an interesting article - just a thought.

    Scientists have used low-intensity electromagnetic fields to treat cancer patients in trials which they say could lead to the development of a new type of anti-tumour therapy.
    Patients hold a spoon-shaped antenna in their mouths to deliver a very low-intensity electromagnetic field in their bodies. In trials of patients with advanced liver cancer, the therapy – given three times a day – resulted in long-term survival for a small number of those monitored, the team has reported in the British Journal of Cancer. Their tumours shrank, while healthy cells in surrounding tissue were unaffected.
    However, the scientists – from the US, Brazil, France and Switzerland – also stressed that the technique was still in its infancy and would require several years for further trials to take place. "This is a truly novel technique," said the team's leader, Professor Boris Pasche of the University of Alabama, Birmingham. "It is innocuous, can be tolerated for long periods of time, and could be used in combination with other therapies."
    Pasche added that he had obtained permission from the US Food and Drug Administration to carry out trials on large groups of patients and was talking to companies in the US, Asia, South America, Russia and Europe about raising funds for future research.
    In 2009, Pasche and his colleagues published results in the Journal of Experimental and Clinical Cancer Research which showed that low-level electromagnetic fields at precise frequencies – ranging from 0.1Hz to 114kHz – halted cancer cell growth in small numbers of patients. Different cancers responded to electromagnetic fields of different frequencies. Cells in surrounding, healthy tissue were unaffected.
    The exact mechanism for this process was not explained in the paper. However, results of recent experiments by the team – using cancer cell cultures in the laboratory and published in the British Journal of Cancer – suggest that low-level electromagnetic fields interfere with the activity of genes in cancer cells. In specific cases, this affected the ability of cancer cells to grow and divide. The spread of tumours halted and in some cases they began to shrink.
    "This is extremely exciting," said Pasche. "We think the technique could also be used to treat breast tumours and possibly other forms of cancer."
    The use of electromagnetic fields was also welcomed, cautiously, by Eleanor Barrie of Cancer Research UK: "This research shows how specific low frequencies of electromagnetic radiation can slow the growth of cancer cells in the lab. It's still unclear why the cancer cells respond in this way, and it's not yet clear if this approach could help patients, but it's an interesting example of how researchers are working to find new ways to home in on cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed."
    The use of electromagnetic fields to treat tumours may seem surprising given recent controversy over claims that fields generated by mobile phones and electricity pylons can trigger cancers and leukaemia. However, Pasche stressed that the intensity of the fields used in his team's experiments were between 100 and 1,000 times lower than those from a mobile phone. "In any case, the evidence produced from major studies of users of these phones does not suggest there is a clearly identifiable risk posed by these electromagnetic fields," he said.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/jan/08/electromagnetic-fields-could-stop-cancer
     
  8. shortbus

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    Sounds like your talking about a form of the Hulda Clark "Zapper". http://www.drclark.net/ Some people in the 'alternative medicine' world swear by it. But all the regular scientists/doctors swear at it. :)
     
  9. steveb

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    Jul 3, 2008
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    Ironic that Hulda died of cancer after claiming in her book "The Cure for All Advanced Cancers", that she knew the cause and cure of all forms of cancer. Apparently she was too busy curing others to have time to try and cure herself.

    Last year my sister died of liver cancer. Someone gave her this book and a "Zapper". It was clear to me that this was a load of crap, but my sister wanted to try the Zapper and I determined it was relatively harmless for her to use (note it can be dangerous to some people, especially those with a pacemaker). So I read the whole book and device instuctions.

    The scam is clear right in the title of the book. Note it is called the cure for all "advanced" cancers. What better way to target desparate people than to market to those that are in the process of dying. Wouldn't it make sense that a cure for all "advanced" cancers is also even more effective for "non-advanced" cancers. If not, apparently you are supposed to wait until the cancer is advanced before you can cure it by her methods. Or maybe she just assumes that no one cares about trying to cure non-advanced cancer. After all, that's just a minor annoyance, not a real threat.

    Basically, all these simple 9 V powered electromagnetic cures are bogus scams. As far as electromagnetic cures in general, wouldn't the first evidence of some effectiveness of electromagnetics be gamma radiation treatments currently in use. A universal cure seems doubtful, but it would be reasonalbe to assume that advancements will continue.
     
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  10. WBahn

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    I should start marketing a homeopathic electromagnetic cure. I can pass 1cc of distilled water by an electromagnet to infuse the water with the essence of the electromagnet. I can then dump that 1cc in a 10l container and fill it with water, giving me a 2C solution (i.e., 1 part of the active solution in 100^2 of the new solution). I can then take take 1cc of that and repeat the process to get a 4C solution. I can then repeat that however many times I need to get into the typical 20C to 30C (afterall, the higher the C rating, the more potent the solution). At each step I can kick all the cans, since that makes them more potent. Then I can sell 10ml vials for $3.99.
     
  11. shortbus

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  12. WBahn

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    Looking down that list, it's amazing how much of the exact same hype and tactics are still in use. Everytime I hear "risk free trial" or "satisfaction 100% guaranteed" I know I am hearing a snake-oil ad. The one that got on a few years ago and it still going strong is the notion that the next ten callers are eligible to participate in a risk free trial or that they are giving away one million bottles of their whatever. One ad that I hear all the time is giving away their crap to the next fifty callers nationwide and that's it. Makes me wonder what is means that they have been running that ad for several years, now. Everytime I hear it I want to call them and ask, "So, let me get this straight, you've been trying to give this thing away for several years and you still haven't found even fifty people that will take it for free?"

    Now consider that we wouldn't be inundated with this crap night and day if it didn't still work on lots and lots of people. Now consider that every one of those people is eligible to vote. Yet people wonder why I assert that civilization is a self-defeating concept.
     
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  13. THE_RB

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    I have no problem with IQ testing and means testing voters.

    Re the scammy electrical health products, there is possibly a beneficial effect from believing in a cure? It's a just a modern form of the witch doctor shaking a rattle over your head to "cure" you. Or the preacher laying on hands.
     
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  14. WBahn

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    Yes, the placebo effect has been pretty well documented. But so has the harmful effect due to people trusting the snake oil and foregoing real medical attention until it is too late. I'm not sure where the balance would come out on that score.
     
  15. THE_RB

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    For sure! But then modern medical treatment is not without fault either, it's way too chemical and knife happy.

    When I was in TV repair for a living I used to joke with a doctor friend that I only charged my patients if the TV was fixed, and had to refund their money if the TV wasn't fixed or failed again. He would counter with "Well I don't charge for fixing, I charge for consulting" and of course I would counter with "But I CAN actually FIX the TVs. If I was no good I'd charge for consulting..." ;)
     
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  16. steveb

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    Jul 3, 2008
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    True enough, and certainly a great joke (the best jokes are truths) to tell to our doctor friends.

    But, on the serious side, can we really compare fixing a TV with fixing a human body? When I was 15, I could repair any TV of those days. Now, 37 years later, I could design a TV, with considerable effort. One person fixing a complex system that another person can engineer is certainly a testament to human progress and human ability. But, equally amazing is our doctors treating illness in a considerably more complex machine that we don't even fully comprehend yet.

    When I'm sick, I'll "consult" with a doctor and take whatever best effort he can offer me. The good ones know their limitations and know how to tap into the total medical knowledge accumulated so far.

    I would likely have been dead 20 years ago from kidney failure if I was born even 10 years earlier because the medicine that has kept my kidneys from degrading was invented only 5 years prior to when I contracted the disease. Yes, the medicine may have been invented by a pharmacist, but at the time, there was no published data that this medicine had this benefit. Only my doctor's experience over the 5 years of him prescribing the medicine told him that this medicine might help me, even though there was no rigorous data to back up his belief. He told me this straight at the time, and then 10 years later was able to show me the latest published studies that confirmed his belief. That's what a good consultant can do for us.

    I'm willing to bet there are many here in this forum that would not be walking the earth right now, without some key medical advancements dispensed by good doctors that saved their life.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012
  17. KJ6EAD

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    I made a cure for cancer from a kit once, but can't remember where I put it or if I gave it away. ;)
     
  18. THE_RB

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    Of course it's not a serious comparison due to the difference in complexity and volatility between the two "devices". ;)

    But I think it holds a wry truth in reference to the industry. Since doctors still get paid the same whether they "fix" you or not, it's way too easy for them to say "Here, try some of these tablets and see if they work" while all the time knowing if that first guess doesn't pay off they can try some different tablets as a second guess, and all entirely at the expense of the patient's money, time and health.

    I often wonder if it was the doctor's child that had the same symptoms, if they would just do that bored cursory 2 minute check and throw a script at them and say "Here son, try some of these tablets and I'll catch up with you in a couple of weeks and see if they worked or not". ;)

    Please don't think I'm anti doctor, as I'm not. However I do think the current medical system is far from perfect.
     
  19. WBahn

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    What gets to me is the industry-wide attitude (and lawyers are worse) that their time is valuable while yours is not. They insist that you arrive well before your appointment time, but then you are rarely seen until well after the appointment time. My doctor's office was routinely making me wait for 30 to 45 minutes past my appointment. I finally revolted and now have a policy that I will arrive at least 15 minutes prior to my appointment, but if I am not being seen within 15 minutes of the appointed time, I leave. The first time I went after making that policy, I told the receptionist that my time was valuable as well and that I would wait no longer than fifteen minutes. They obviously didn't believe me. So when the fifteen minutes was up, I went up and told them that the limit had been reached, that I leaving, that I would call to reschedule, and that if it happened again I would find another doctor. She immediately said, "Oh, we can get you in right now," to which I responded, "then you should have gotten me in before the fifteen minute limit expired. Good day," and I left. Amazingly, I have never had to wait more than fifteen minutes in the several years since.

    It's amazing how reasonable people become when they are forced to realize that no matter how little they think they need my business, the simple fact is that I need to do business with them even less.
     
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  20. steveb

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    Jul 3, 2008
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    Absolutely.

    My chiropractor is a good tool I use to combat some of the negative aspects of current medical practices. I could tell a good number of examples of where a simple chiropractic adjustment fixed a problem that baffled many doctors after thousands of dollars of tests. But, when the current medical practices work, they work very well.

    My chiropractor told me that there is an asian school of thought that you should only pay your doctor when you are healthy. When you are sick, you stop paying and the doc has to work very hard to get you back on a paying basis again. My chiropractor would like to institute this practice, but it is not legal in the USA because it falls under an auspices of an insurance plan.
     
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