Creating an electronic scoreboard...

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by roverken, Dec 26, 2013.

  1. roverken

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 26, 2013
    1
    0
    Hi people of All About Circuits :)

    This is my first post here in these forums, hopefully the first of many. It is wonderful to find such an informative community. :D

    But anyway, to go straight to the subject at hand... me and my friends are trying to build a simple electronic scoreboard, but we don't have any idea how to build it, or even the parts we require. I have searched the forums and I found something very similar to what we have in mind:

    http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/showpost.php?p=453469&postcount=7

    The electronic scoreboard should have buttons as input to increase the score and reset it back to zero. We are also required to program it using the Assembly language, and use a breadboard.

    Can anyone please suggest or enumerate the parts we would need for this project? I am an absolute beginner (read: zero experience with making this kind of stuff, and all) and knows very little with regards to these things.

    Thanks!
     
  2. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    2,515
    785
    From the picture in th elink I can see:

    15 resitors
    1 diode
    1 Microcontroller
    4 Transistors
    2 7-seg 2 digits
    1 Polaroized capacitor
    1 ceramic disc
    1 etched PCB
    1 connector of some type, top right corner


    So I' guess you need some of this... :D

    Why Assemby?

    Oh yeah.... Welcome to the forum!
     
  3. elec_mech

    Senior Member

    Nov 12, 2008
    1,513
    193
    Welcome to AAC.

    Is this for a school assignment?

    If you're not required to program in Assembly, or at all for that matter, just use a few CD40110 IC's. Each IC controls one 7-segment digit and will increment, decrement, and reset said digit. You can cascade them easily so counting 00-99 is a snap.

    If you must program and have zero experience, I'd suggest using a PICAXE. These are programmed in BASIC - far, far easier than Assembly and reasonably inexpensive.
     
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