Converting Static Random Hertz To AC Current

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by joseph22, May 15, 2015.

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  1. joseph22

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    May 15, 2015
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    The noise referred to in the title is sometimes referred to as space noise. Not referring to radio static at around 60HZ. As the earth spins and rotates, a constant sound is generated and is detected with underwater sound surveillance equipment. This sound is 6-8HZ. Is it possible to boost the strength of this signal and run it through attenuator banks? Maybe, enough OHM's could be accomplished to provide 12 Volts of useable current.
     
  2. Kermit2

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    Feb 5, 2010
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    i cannot think of ANY source of electrical noise that one can convert to useable 'current'. converting into voltage is doable, but not a current capable of doing any WORK.
     
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  3. Hypatia's Protege

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    Please expand on this, IMO it makes no sense...:confused:
    (i.e. Voltage [EMF] is not current and resistance would seem inapplicable in this context)

    Moreover you seem to be confusing AF electromagnetic radiation with sound (i.e. kinetic oscillation)...

    Best regards
    HP
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2015
  4. joseph22

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    May 15, 2015
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    If you can come up with voltage, is it possible to run this voltage through vibrating Mercury to develop current?
     
  5. kubeek

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    What? :eek: What does mercury have to do with anything? Or did you mean planet Mercury?
     
  6. Hypatia's Protege

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    With sincere respect, I think you need to review basic electrical principles...

    With constructive intent
    HP
     
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  7. DerStrom8

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    Feb 20, 2011
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    Your horrendous misuse of simple terminology suggests you don't have the slightest understanding of basic electrical concepts. I suggest you do some research before pursuing this further. You'll save yourself a lot of time.
     
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  8. alfacliff

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    vibrating mercury does not generate electricity. and there is no em or audio available (other than lightning, and it dosnt last long enough to generate any usable work) with enough strength to do any usable work, or supply usable power. science fiction isnt always science fact.
     
  9. joseph22

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    May 15, 2015
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    Mercury is a good conductor of electricity. When it is vibrated, it produces current. So, if 6-8HZ can be converted to voltage, why not run this voltage through vibrating Mercury to produce a useable current.
     
  10. Hypatia's Protege

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    @joseph22
    Are you, perhaps, thinking of rectification/detection techniques...?

    Best regards
    HP
     
  11. MikeML

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    Joseph, are you a troll?
     
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  12. DerStrom8

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    Haha that's hilarious!
     
  13. Hypatia's Protege

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    Potential difference is produced when conductors cut magnetic flux howbeit, by no stretch of logic, is your post descriptive of practical generation technique...

    Best regards
    HP
     
  14. DerStrom8

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    Perhaps you're thinking of piezoelectric elements? Vibrating a conductor of electricity does not generate current.
     
  15. OBW0549

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    This thread is nuts.
     
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  16. Hypatia's Protege

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    @joseph22

    Please be advised that 'voltage' cannot be converted to current per se --- Rather, a current exists wherever a 'voltage' (i.e. potential difference) is imposed across a finite impedance...

    Best regards
    HP
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2015
  17. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    In the interest of maintaining AAC at some respectable standard this thread is now closed.
     
  18. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    There is no thing like free energy.
    You can convert a voltage to a lower voltage with higher current.
    The output power will always be lower as the input power due to conversion losses.

    Bertus
     
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