converting schematics

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by hashmaster, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. hashmaster

    Thread Starter Member

    May 30, 2012
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    So I am working on building a small negative ion generator. I have found some schematics, but it runs on a higher voltage then I am trying to use.
    I am looking for help turning it from a 12v in to 6v in. I plan on using 4 AA batteries as my power supply. Here is a link to the schematic. http://www.sentex.ca/~mec1995/circ/hv/niongen/niongen2.html
     
  2. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    The bridge rectifier is specified as a 4A part. Allowing for a 50% safety factor, this would mean that the circuit could draw 2A continuously. This would translate to 24 watts, and if the voltage is reduced to 6, then the current increases to 4A. Your AA batteries won't work for long, if at all.
     
  3. Dodgydave

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 22, 2012
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    The transformer is rated at 1.2amp, so maybe it takes 500 to 600mA, also if you reduce the supplly to 6V, the auto transformer will also give out a reduced voltage only 4Kv instead of the designed 8Kv, and will need rewinding.
     
  4. hashmaster

    Thread Starter Member

    May 30, 2012
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    Well I'm still new in electronics, and didn't think about the power. I was thinking of just removing the bridged rectifier and using the batteries. I guess I was figuring this was a similar circuit to that being used in a 5v usb negative ion generator I saw for sale. My main base for that I guess was the 555 timer. So now I guess the question becomes "Can I use the previously posted schematics to build a similar 6v device capable of running on 4 AA's"?
     
  5. hashmaster

    Thread Starter Member

    May 30, 2012
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    Couldn't I just change the T2 to Have a higher turns to step the voltage back up.
     
  6. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Probably. But it would be nice to know the factors that affect ion generation. I mean, voltage may not matter all that much (once you are above some threshold) compared to surface area, air flow rate, whatever. You should absolutely be able to run that circuit off 5V.
     
  7. hashmaster

    Thread Starter Member

    May 30, 2012
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    Yeah I've been searching around on ion generation, and what I got was air over charged point equals ionized air. They recommend a fine point, I guess I will build it tomorrow along with the ion detector I saw on there, and maybe test some things out.
     
  8. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    I googled around for ion generator kits, but didn't find anything that was battery powered. Most are mains powered, and there is definitely a shock hazard. A battery powered unit would be safer.
     
  9. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
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    Four AA's should be fine. A zenon flash trigger coil, with sone simple circuitry, should give around 4kV, which would be about right output V. Output current 1 μA to 10 μA
     
  10. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Yes, I think surface area is probably rate limiting. Once you can drive the charge into the air, then your limiting factor becomes refreshing the charge. That requires frequently refreshing the high voltage charge on the electrode or antenna, or whatever you call it.
     
  11. hashmaster

    Thread Starter Member

    May 30, 2012
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    Yeah all the real more powerful ionizer's are all from main, but i have seen a few little personal one that are 5 and 12 volt which is what brought me to think this would work.

    This is all just a prototyping phase to test how effective it is for putting it into a small air filter. Time to start building and testing.
     
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