Converting a DC input to a sine wave

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by gibberellingirl, Apr 10, 2010.

  1. gibberellingirl

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 10, 2010
    1
    0
    Hello,

    I was wondering if there was a way to create a relatively high frequency sine wave (5-6 kHz) from a DC input. I am working on a project where the user needs to locate a remote object by pressing a button on his/her bracelet. My idea was to use an RF transmitter and receiver. The receiver output is then connected to a piezoelectric speaker which guides the user to the object. The one problem is that I don't know how to convert a DC input to a sine wave. Also, two constraints: since the bracelet is going to be worn, it cannot be too big and no microcontrollers (nature of the project).

    Thank you,
    Hazal
     
  2. Jazz Bass Special

    New Member

    Apr 9, 2010
    24
    5
    I am thinking of a 555 timer IC that is already setup to output the frequency.
    The Vdc would be used as an input to the 555 to trigger it on.
     
  3. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,634
    2,342
    Hello,

    @Jazz Bass Special,
    The 555 will produce a squarewave signal and not the requested sine wave.

    @gibberellingirl,

    On this page yoy will find a lot of pages on sine wave oscillators:
    http://www.educypedia.be/electronics/analogosciltypes.htm

    Take a look at the RC or wienbridge oscillator section on that page.

    Bertus
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,764
    2,534
    Given the OPs description it doesn't need to be a sine wave, they are just wanting a tone. A 555 can do this with 4 parts, including battery.
     
  5. Bychon

    Member

    Mar 12, 2010
    469
    41
    If you only want to find the object, you can buy a thing called a "Cat Finder". If you want to build a project, ignore this and procede as usual.
     
  6. Rosh

    New Member

    Apr 11, 2010
    1
    0
    Dear friend, convering dc into ac can be done by oscillators. weinbridge oscillator is a good choice. or transistor oscillators (since for 5 to 6 khz BC107 is enough). It will convert the vcc from power supply to sine wave.all the best
     
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