Convert 120Watts to 15000Watts

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Jacquesl, Feb 4, 2007.

  1. Jacquesl

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 9, 2006
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    Combine 1V @ 60A = 60Watts
    250V @ 0.24A = 60Watts

    So my big question is, can I take that two separately 60watt power supply = 120watt
    And make it give me a output of total 250V @ 60A = 15000Watts :rolleyes:
    Combine the to inputs and feed it to a transformer
    In theory, I will end up with 120Watts and not 15000Watts
    and how does it work, that I can send a DC source of 28V @ 10A and 250V @ 0.30A down the same cable but that 10A doesn’t help then it come to the 250V
    So that 10A it’s only available then it comes to the 28V loads and the same with the 250V @ 0.30A

    So does anyone know a solution?
     
  2. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
    4,670
    804
    I totaly don´t know what you are talking about.
    So you want to combine the power supllies in series, right? Then the voltage (are we talking about DC or AC?) adds up and the current is limited by the lower of what the two supllies are capable of. So you can get alltogether 251V@0.24A = 60.24W.


    Simply you can´t have 28V and 250V in one cable at the same time, unless you have multiple wires in it (at least three).
     
  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,136
    1,786
    Listen very carefully. There is no free lunch, and there never was, and there never will be!
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
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    I am afraid what you are proposing is not possible.

    The output of two separate power supplies do not combine in the manner you have described.

    You may want to visit the tutorial at www.AllAboutCircuits.com and read up in DC circuits. This will provide you with a better understanding of the behaviour of DC power sources when combined in series.

    hgmjr
     
  5. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
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    Isn't that one of the translations of the First Law of Thermogodammits?
     
  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,136
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    I dunno...
    I always rememberd them as:
    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1.  
    2. 1st Law: You can't win
    3. 2nd Law: You can't break even
    4. 3rd Law: You can't get out of the game
    5.  
     
  7. Jacquesl

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 9, 2006
    29
    0
    Sorry for taking so long…. to respond, I wasn’t notified by email :confused: email I probably did not ticked the notification ticker

    Yip I know this will be impossible to do just by using the ordinary electronic parts, but this “Convert 120Watts to 15000Watts” is only a example :eek:

    What about his Idea, a small nuclear reaction inside the PSU, this stuff doesn’t exist yet, and use the hydrogen to feed a fuel cell, if It have to, you will probably not want an internal combustion chamber inside your UPS or TV. lol

    Take the CO2 make the C turn into H via neutron capture and then you just use that O2 + H = Energy
    If you turn C to H there will be some energy release I’m not yet 100% sure where, but somewhere there will be a gain, because it took energy to make H-1 turn to C

    So I want to take C-12 / C-13 and convert the isotopes to C-1, but now someone told me, I cant make it C-1, I can only make it C-8, so that sucks, I still belief, there might be some possible, so in the end we will have a problem with not enough CO2 pollution and a water rise from all the units, lol

    The heavier a element gets the more energy is absorb inside it, like U and Po, and very packed with energy and it’s way down on the Isotope and Periodic table
     
  8. Jacquesl

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 9, 2006
    29
    0
    No for real, I connected DC-28V @10Amps and DC-250V @.30Amps all in the same cable + and – “2 wires” with the use of diodes of course and then the DC-250V gets drained by the bulb then the DC-28V try’s to keep up, with a low glow,
    AC will also work, if it’s well synchronized, but DC is easier
    But it’s all just for testing purpose, it’s not really practical to do it like that, just for fun, I did that 4 months ago
     
  9. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,136
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    I think the rest of us can now safely ignore your ramblings since they contain no useful content.
     
  10. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    Total circuit current equals Applied Voltage divided by Total Circuit Impedence. Period.

    The maximum safe operating ampacity of the power supplies don't mean a whit. Ohm's Law is called a "law" because it always works, all the time, every time, no exceptions. Ever. No matter what one's mind-set may be.



    As far as science fiction mumbo-jumbo, I always liked "zero point energy." Much more science ficiton mumbo-jumbo, and we'll need to move this thread into the "off topic" forum.
     
  11. Jacquesl

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 9, 2006
    29
    0
    Lol, ok suite yourself, you can stay with your 4 parts, coils, caps, resistors and transistors ;)

    I still think nuclear “lowest radiation” might be our future.

    Well it was a try, It will probably not work :cool:

    thingmaker3, your right this is starting to go off topic, it’s not a allaboutnuclear forum :D
     
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