controller for Split AC Temperature remote

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Rushdev, Sep 18, 2013.

  1. Rushdev

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2012
    9
    0
    Hi I'm not too good with circuitry... I recently installed/had installed a Split AC. It came with a remote and I thought that I'd be able to program the remote to have the AC turn on/off at a certain temp. It turns out that it can't do that, all it has is a timer, 24 hr and then it has to be reset.
    What I want is a selonoid that will push the on/off button once to turn it on at a certain temp and then push it once again to turn it off at a certain temp. All the plunger has to do it push it and return to orig position.
    Is there something like that? Can I get some advice on a simple circuit?
    Thanks
    Rush
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,542
    2,369
    Are you looking at a mechanical means of pushing an On/Off button?
    Which is a bit crude, unless you do not want to do anything invasive on the remote?
    Is there no way to wire a relay directly into the AC control circuit?.
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2013
  3. Rushdev

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2012
    9
    0
    What I'd like to do is wire in a normal programmable thermostat. I've investgated 'normal' thermostats, but they are based on 24v or whatever v, and I can't find what v mine works at. Here is a link to the website that has some info
    http://www.thermospace.com/ductless_split/senville-aura-sena18hf.php
    I've also checked on the web and nobody has any info about how to hook up a regular thermostat to it. I've talked with the Nest people (semi-intelligent thermostat that 'learns'), they can't help. I've called the Senville people and gotten block diagrams, but no schematics or anything that shows the actual wiring in the unit.
    I guess I should really take it apart and see if I can find a point to control the on/off.
    Here is the block dia -
    Thanks
    Rush
     
  4. RamaD

    Active Member

    Dec 4, 2009
    254
    33
    IMHO, the AC normally has this in-built, and turns on the compressor when the temperature goes above the set temperature, and turns off when the temperature is above the set temperature, with a hysterisis. This not only saves the power, but also controls the temperature. Controlling the hysterisis is generally not made available, or turning on above some temperature and turning off below some other temperature, etc., also may not be available. But isnt there a provision to set the required temperature?
     
  5. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
    4,010
    1,530
    Don't mean to be mean, but did you read the directions on how to operate the unit? Or the page you linked for your unit?

    Although I didn't look for a manual, the remote shows a "temp" setting button right in the middle of it. http://www.thermospace.com/shinco/remote-features.jpg

    Also read the part in the link (about the middle of the page) called "what is DC inverter?". According to it the unit never shuts off after start-up. It just 'slows down' when the set temperature is reached.

    Some times reading the manual is a good thing.:):D
     
  6. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,284
    6,797
    Let me see if I got this right. You want an air conditioner with an unusually wide range between the temperature it starts at and the temperature it stops at, so you searched until you found an air conditioner that had thousands of hours of development work and more than one microprocessor put into making sure it had the lowest possible temperature differential, and bought it. Now you want to defeat the main reason it was designed. Is that about right?
     
  8. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Rofl

    rtfm
     
    #12 likes this.
  9. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,120
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    Not if you read and believe their ad materials. The claim is that it runs all the time but with a proportional duty cycle. It's not on/off control, which they make fun of in their literature.
     
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  10. RamaD

    Active Member

    Dec 4, 2009
    254
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    I must admit I did not read the brochure!
    Still, I dont understand. That is, whether it is On/Off or Variable Frequency Drive, there is in-built control to adjust the temperature. Why would the OP need the AC be turned on or off by another means?
    BTW, I just noticed that the AC seem to be almost double the price of an equivalent sized unit here in India, at around USD 750 (46000 INR) for a 1.5ton. Is it because of digital inverter technology?
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,284
    6,797
    Yes, it has variable frequency drive for the compressor, and a microprocessor to measure temperature change and predict the correct speed to maintain the room temperature at exactly the same temperature, all the time. Incredible amounts of time and money were dedicated to achieve this and the result is much more expensive that the standard air conditioners and thermostats that maintain temperature within 2 degrees F.

    Even the old thermostats do not have a hysteresis adjustment. You would have to use 2 thermostats and design circuits to have one control the start temperature and another control the stop temperature if you want the error to be more than 2 degrees from the set point.
     
    RamaD likes this.
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