control digital camera using micro -controller

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by u-a-l, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. u-a-l

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 12, 2010
    27
    0
    hi 2 all
    any one have idea about control digital camera using micro -controller help me please
     
  2. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
    2,576
    231
    Details!...details!...details! What camera? what uC? What do you want the uC to do with the camera?

    Ken
     
  3. u-a-l

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 12, 2010
    27
    0
    it's any digital camera
    i need control digital camera using pic i mean move the camera forward , backward , left & wright all that when some thing happed like noise by using motor
    4 example when sound coming from north the camera move by motor 2 north and take many picture from that said
    i hope u understand me ???
     
  4. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    A camera is usually fixed in one location, but may have motors control the pan and tilt. The motions you describe are only possible with a motorized carrier.

    Is the sound detection and localization already done, or do you need assistance in that as well?
     
  5. u-a-l

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 12, 2010
    27
    0
    u r wright but i mean is there are way or pin in micro-controller that can connect the pic with camera
     
  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    The link shows one example of a computer controlled camera mount.

    Another way is to obtain a pan - tilt motorized mount and control the motors with a microcontroller. The exact control is dependent on the type of motors used. You could make a mount using stepper motors as well.

    Neither method addresses the actual motion on space, nor the detection of sound.
     
  7. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
    594
    Triggering the camera itself depends a lot on the camera. I have one that can be controlled by a switch on a wire and also by IR. I have a cheaper camera that has neither. Which is yours?
     
  8. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
    214
    If you don't mind the risk of damage to the camera, you can try desoldering the camera's trigger and using a relay (easy) or a transistor (harder, cheaper) to act as a switch.
     
  9. u-a-l

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 12, 2010
    27
    0
    markd77 i hope 2 tell more about this camera and if u have links or books about this please share it with me
     
  10. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
    594
    My camera that can be triggered by wire or IR remote is a Pentax K200D, which isn't made any more. Most DSLRs can be triggered remotely. The Pentax uses a 2.5mm headphone socket for the wire triggering.
     
  11. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    On the camera side, I solder in an smt transistor across the On/Off switch of my Canon 520s. That entails removing the case, gluing the transistor and making the solder connections. I then run a wire to the USB port where I glue in an smt resistor and solder the transistor base to that, then to the unused USB pin. The camera is then closed back up.

    I have constructed a circular base geared to a stepper motor, upon which I mount a PVC tube that holds the camera. upon this base, encircling the stepper is a fabbed PCB which is mounted an Atmel 8051 core micro, along with a MAX3421 USB host, an RTC, stepper driver, and a couple of misc devices.

    I use this contraption for game scouting, but who know's what else.

    The 'system' is continually changing, but at this time I have it configured so that the 8051 utilizes an 8 bit port as interrupt inputs (triggers) to wake the micro. Triggers to date include the resident RTC, PIR, and trip triggers.

    In it's simplest mode, upon trigger, the camera is turned on with a timed pulse to the implanted camera transistor via the USB port. The micro then attempts USB communications with the camera via the MAX3421, until it confirms a powered up state. Now, with only your imagination, can you pan, zoom, focus, shutter, etc. to capture images. After the sequence, another timed pulse to the impanted camera switch turns the camera off, and the micro goes back to sleep, awaiting another trigger.

    IN your case, determining the direction of sound, could be a challenge. But a bit of ingenuity could overcome.
     
  12. u-a-l

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 12, 2010
    27
    0


    Thank u for your post GetDeviceInfo
    but sorry honestly am not understand what u want tell me exactly :confused:
     
  13. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    you asked for some ideas, and I responded with a couple that I've put into practice. maybe I've posted to the wrong thread though, it's happened in the past.
     
Loading...