continous power generator

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by WALLA2, Oct 3, 2011.

  1. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    hi im new to this site and dont know much about electronics, im trying to find out if i can have something that measures a current from a generator at ,say 20v, and then puts all excess power in a battery of some sort.
    please dont use computer language or i won't understand. i am trying to make a continuous power generator and would like all the help i can get as im still new to circuit boards and the like.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2011
  2. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    can people please make a reply because i think i need to do this quickly and even if it doesnt help it will be appreciated
     
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    6,804
    OK. First we need to get some definitions in place. Power is measured in watts, voltage is volts, and current is amps. Volts times amps equals watts.

    If I read this right, you want all the extra current put into a battery if the voltage is over 20 volts. This is achievable but, the amount of amps or power is needed to adjust the size of the parts correctly.

    What size of a battery (in amp hours and volts). What type of battery (car battery, Nickle/Metal Halide, ni-cad)? Is it a generator or an alternator with rectifiers? How many amps can it deliver? Does it have a regulator internal to it? How steady is the power source that is turning the generator?

    Start reading labels and reporting what you have to work with. Then go to user CP to put in where you live. (That tells us where you can get parts.)

    Edit: This is a volunteer site. You really can't expect answers in 30 minutes because we have people all over the planet helping here. Some of them are asleep even as I type this.
     
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  4. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    i dont have the readings because i made the design up and the way it works is that over a time period the amount of electrical energy will build up.
     
  5. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    also 20 watts is just an estimate so i dont know what the power limit will be, im sorry if this is confusing as i'm not entirely sure what im doing.
     
  6. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    what would you reccomen for a battery? i would need a big one so a car battery might work.
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    You have to give more clues. Did you realize there is an energy source available and decided to put it to work? Is it a windmill? a stream? a motor? How did you come to the idea that 20 volts will happen? Are you thinking about using some car batteries that didn't have anything to do at the moment?
     
  8. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    'alternator with rectifiers' 'regulator internal'? you have confused me already:confused:
     
  9. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    sort of a windmill with electromagnets
     
  10. WALLA2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 3, 2011
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    also 20volts is just a guess i havent tested this theiry yet so i dont even know if it will work
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Old car generators made DC voltage and used carbon brushes. The voltage went to an external regulator that kept the voltage correct for charging the battery. Modern car alternators make AC voltage, rectify it with internal rectifiers, and have a voltage regulator inside them. Not much you can do (easily) to make them dance to any different tune than charging a car battery.

    However, this sounds like all you need is a modern alternator, a car battery, and some belts and pulleys.
     
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