Constant current source for a laser diode

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by electrophile, Jan 24, 2016.

  1. electrophile

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 30, 2013
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    I'm trying to replicate this circuit for a 2W laser diode engraver. I could understand most of the other components except the current source schematic (Pg. 5, Fig 4). I understand that the TLC271 is being operated in high-bias mode (cause the datasheet says that when the bias select pin is grounded its in high-bias mode), however, I do not understand how the combination of RV2, R16 and R18 works and what values need to be set. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. ronv

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    Nov 12, 2008
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    They are used to cancel the offset of the op amp. I'm not sure why they are worried about it as they adjust the current anyway. I'm not crazy about that op amp. It also seems like there might be easier ways to pwm it.
     
  3. sailorjoe

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    Jun 4, 2013
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    I believe the schematic in Figure 4 is labeled incorrectly. On the TLC271, pin 8 should be Bias Select, and pin 1 should be Offset In 1, and pin 5 should be Offset In 2. Perhaps there is a different package not in the datasheet. In any case, the circuit seems to be wired correctly for proper use.
    Ronv's explanation is correct.
     
  4. Dodgydave

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    Jun 22, 2012
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    Its just a constant current led driver, any op amp will do the job use the Tlc272 dual version or lm358.
     
  5. electrophile

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    Aug 30, 2013
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  6. Dodgydave

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    As long as they can cope with your led current, they should work.
     
  7. sailorjoe

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    Jun 4, 2013
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    Yes, but these aren't plug-in replacements, you'll have to redesign the circuit for these chips. Fortunately, the datasheets are very complete and give you lots of information to use.
     
  8. ronv

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    Do you have a data sheet for you laser diode? Sometimes they are a little more fussy than LEDs.
     
  9. electrophile

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    Aug 30, 2013
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    This is what I could source from the web (attached). Also, I was trying to design for ST's ST1CC40 using their eDesign Studio software on their website. I was obviously trying to create a constant current source for LEDs and one of the design inputs was for something called "Rd (ohms)". I assume its the resistance of the laser diode which unfortunately is not listed in the datasheet. I calculated this value using the voltage (~4.5V) and current (~1.2A) required to turn on the laser. Is that right?
     
  10. ronv

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    I'm not sure what they mean by Rd. I'll try to look tomorrow.
    But for now, here is what I would recommend.
    Buy a good quality switch mode power supply (wall wort) rated at 3 amps or so rather than trying to build one.
    Then I think their constant current source can be made with more common devices. I can draw one up if you like.
    I haven't convinced myself that their fancy reference supply is needed - need to look closer at it.
     
  11. electrophile

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 30, 2013
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    Yep I have a 12V, 10A SMPS power supply that I'll be using for powering the whole setup including the stepper motors and build a 5V supply off it to power my Arduino and the motor drivers.

    I'd really appreciate that. Thanks.
     
  12. electrophile

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    Aug 30, 2013
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    Got it. Redesigning with these would be more simpler since they seem to be using common components and it would eliminate some of the other circuits that are in the original design.
     
  13. Colin55

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    Aug 27, 2015
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    You just need a 2 -3 amp DC power supply, a transistor, signal diode and a few resistors.
    The DC supply should be low voltage. As low as 5v
    You can get one on eBay for $2.00
     
  14. Dodgydave

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    Jun 22, 2012
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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2016
  15. ronv

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    Take a look at this one.
    It does not have isolation between the mico (PWM) and has just a simple adjustment for the power.
     
  16. ScottWang

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    Aug 23, 2012
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    Could you attach the asc file?
    Thanks.
     
  17. ronv

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    Sure.
     
    ScottWang likes this.
  18. electrophile

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    Aug 30, 2013
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    Thanks @Dodgydave. This helps. I'm gonna try this since I think I have most of the components at home.

    Thanks @ronv. The help is much appreciated. I will try this one out too. For now I do not need PWM but a simple turn on and off and I think I can manage that with a simple optocoupler such as the 4N25.
     
  19. electrophile

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    Aug 30, 2013
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    @ronv, Could you please attach the libraries and symbols for the potentiometer and the OPA743 op-amp?
     
  20. ScottWang

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    Aug 23, 2012
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    I was used the normal op amp to replaced it, but I still can't find the potentiometer, it's weird, I used the pot before, but I can't find it after I was updated a couple times later.
    The op amp is at the\lib\sym\opamp\opamp.asy
     
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