connecting ac and dc sources in parallel??

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by rrrchandu, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. rrrchandu

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 9, 2010
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    Hello,
    If we connect an ac source of 50Hz and a dc source with equal value of voltage what will be the voltage in parallel to them???
     
  2. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
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    :rolleyes:I dunno.......but I think I smell smoke...............:rolleyes:
     
  3. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    As an aside. Unless otherwise noted the voltage of an AC source is given in RMS voltage. Given it is as sinewave. The peak value of the AC source will be about 1.41 time higher
     
  4. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    "Smoke" would be the correct answer in the real world. In the mathematical model world... there simply is no answer. Each source defines the terminal voltages differently. It would be the same if you paralleled two DC sources of different voltages.

    It would be the same if you define A=B where A = 50 and B = 25. The statements just don't work.

    Is this a general question or something specific you are trying to do?
     
  5. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
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    Not possible to say because you have not provided enough information to give a definitive answer.

    So when you do it be sure to have the Storage O'scope and data logger and video camera hooked up and report back to us so we will be able to share in your discovery.

    The video camers is to record the smoke which might it hard to read the scope and datalogger.
     
  6. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Hypothetically, the results would be unknown without more information on the impedances of the sources.

    In real life, as everyone else has already said, something is gonna blow.
     
  7. rrrchandu

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 9, 2010
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    thank you,
    it is very specific. i am just analyzing the working of transistor amplifier as it will have an ac and a dc source at its terminals of base-emitter. they are having different voltage levels.
    what would be the voltage across it??
     
  8. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    If you have them in parallel one of them will pass away with lots of smoke.
    If you put them in series things start to make more sense.
     
    PackratKing likes this.
  9. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Why didn't you say that in the first place?
    Use superposition and add the two.
     
  10. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
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    It is such a help when you actually clearly state what it is you want to know rather than some superficial statement oversimplifying to the point that you cannot possibly get meaningful answers that would have you going away frustrated. People here can only answer based on the information YOU the questioner provide.
     
  11. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    Post a schematic. Otherwise we'll just continue to play 20 questions.
     
  12. rrrchandu

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 9, 2010
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    no yaar
    as the transistor is non linear element superposition theorem is not applicable here
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
  13. rrrchandu

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 9, 2010
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