Connecting 60Hz supply to a 50Hz heater

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by elect2005, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. elect2005

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2015
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    I am not an electrical engineer by profession. But I interact a lot with electrical engineers as part of my job.

    Having said above, for an Oil and Gas project, we are trying to buy a 60Hz/254V powered convection heaters, the kind you find in hotel rooms for a room within a floating rig. we are not able to find a heater supplier matching above specs. what we are getting is 230V/50Hz.

    I am aware that world is divided between either 50Hz/230V or 60Hz/110v as far as single phase AC is concerned. I am therefore assuming 60Hz/230V combination equipment would be hard to find.

    1. what would happen if a 60Hz supply is given to 50Hz equipment?
    2. what is the effect of 254V on a rated 230V equipment? do the standard equipment like heaters bought off catalogues have inherent margin?

    It may be reasonable to assume that these heaters would come with some electronics for temperature control, and are generally powered internally.

    A practical guide would be helpful.
     
  2. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    As to #1 it really depends on the equipment. Most electrical equipment is rated 50/60 Hz so it runs on either mains frequency. Motors for example running directly off mains depending on motor will run at different speeds.

    As to #2 Heaters are resistive devices and frequency doesn't matter. In the case you mention the higher mains voltage (running a 230 vlt heater on 254 volts the heater element would have a shorter life.

    Here in the US the common mains power is 60 Hz (N. America) and mains voltages are 120, 240 and 480 to name a few common voltages. There are also 277 volt lighting circuits normally in industry (this is because in a 480 volt WYE 3 phase system 277 is a phase to neutral voltage). The 254 volts you mention is peculiar and not one I am familiar with but as to heating elements any 240 volt heating elements should work fine.

    Ron
     
  3. elect2005

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2015
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    Reloadron, it is not a motor, a convection heater bought off catalogue. (equipment is on a floating production rig, voltage produced by onboard GTG, 440V 3 phase, amounting to 254V single phase between line and neutral).

    It is not dual frequency rated. Does heater care for frequency?
     
  4. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    I only mentioned motors because you asked:
    Motors was with regard to #1. :)

    Anyway, heater elements don't care as to the frequency. DC, 50 Hz or 60 Hz is all the same to a heater element.

    Ron
     
  5. elect2005

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2015
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    ok, thank you. it is a useful answer, and matches with what I think :)

    I am assuming that any electronics (for temp control) that comes with this heater, remains unaffected as well from 60Hz, as electronics run on DC, assuming converted within heater from source supply,
     
  6. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
    963
    232
    Yes, most controllers for heater elements are 50/60 Hz. Just make sure the mains frequency is spelled out in the controller data sheet.

    Ton
     
  7. elect2005

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2015
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    perfect, cheers.
     
  8. Roderick Young

    Member

    Feb 22, 2015
    408
    168
    I don't personally see a problem with running a 50 Hz heater at 60 Hz, although if there is forced air anywhere, that the blowers might have slightly different output.

    However, if it was my own project, and I was getting paid for it, I would try to get clearance from the manufacturer that it was ok to do so. Heaven forbid, but if something went wrong like there was a fire, I would not want the insurance company to balk because I ran equipment outside of its rated specs.
     
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