Connect Larger DC Motors to PS3 Controller

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by MyTPioneer, Dec 18, 2015.

  1. MyTPioneer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 18, 2015
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    I've scoured the net and can't seem to find enough to go off of on this one. I don't mind trying a few different things, but I don't want to waste money on unneeded components and I also don't want to burn anything up.

    What I'd like to do is remove the two existing motors from within my PS3 controller and then connect the leads that are currently connected to those motors into a circuit that will trigger two larger DC motors instead when the same signal is sent through the controller. I believe the motors that are in it are about 3-5v each, and the two that I'm looking to replace them with are about 15v each.

    I think this can be accomplished without having to use an Arduino or other type of logic device, but I really don't know. Can I somehow run my leads into a breadboard that is also connected to a 15v DC power supply, and then use a transistor, diode, and resistor to somehow accomplish the task that I'm looking for?

    Thank you very much for any feedback that you can provide.

    Darryl
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    2,371
    I assume these are variable speed operations, you could look at the present output device(s) if it is bi-dir PWM control you most likely could either replace the present output semi's and feed those only with the higher voltage. Or depending on the part No's, you may be able to use the present devices, do you have any details on the present drive?
    Max.
     
  3. MyTPioneer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 18, 2015
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    Max,

    Sorry, but I'm not clear on what your asking with '...details on the present drive'. As far as variable speed, from what I can tell that is not the case. It appears that every so often, in order to simulate feedback, a signal is either sent to the left motor, right motor, or both. The signals last anywhere from less than a second to 4-5 seconds. One motor is smaller with less weight than the other and the imbalance plays into the shake.

    I would be fine with something that could watch for any signal coming through the leads from the old motors, and when it does, enable the new motor for that same amount of time. Basically like a switch. If more than 0v comes out of line 1, enable the 15v motor at full speed until the voltage drops back to 0.

    Let me know if that gives you any more to go off of and I'll do my best to track down any suggestions that you may have.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,547
    2,371
    If it is on/off control then it should be relatively simple, but exactly what component(s) presently switches the motor on would help.
    I assume the switches are not controlling them direct?
    Max.
     
  5. MyTPioneer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 18, 2015
    12
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    Right. The switches don't control them directly. It would be a signal that is fed back from the gaming system to the controller that then fires off each motor.

    I've attached a picture of the inside of a controller. The two motors are at the bottom left and right and connected to the board via the tiny black and red wires. Again, I was hoping to desolder the existing wires and somehow feed them into something else that could tell if any voltage was coming through them. If so, enable the new motor.
     
  6. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,770
    970
    Take the 2 wires that feed each existing motor and just use them to energize a relay.. switching on the larger dc motors through the contacts.. 2 relays and done..
     
  7. MyTPioneer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 18, 2015
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    Thank you mcgyvr. I'll definitely look into the relay and see what I can come up this weekend.
     
  8. MyTPioneer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 18, 2015
    12
    0
    I tried a relay with no luck, and then tried a MOSFET transistor. It didn't quite work the way I expected either, but it was a good learning experience. I happened to have a L298N Dual H-Bridge Motor Controller for an Arduino that I had previously purchased and after reading a little about it, discovered that it would do exactly what I was looking for. It might be overkill, but at least it is working for now. Thank you both for the help.
     
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