Confusion with Range Hood Blower Fan Motor - 9 Wires

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Mikeysp, May 11, 2016.

  1. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
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    My range exhaust hood electronics failed; however, I think the motor is still good. I want to bypass the digital controls with a simpler circuit for my skill level.

    I have attached some images to aid in understanding.

    I would like to run my 120VAC hot wire through a toggle switch and then run both wires through a speed controller into the correct wires to run it at hiogh speed. I would then adjust speed with the speed controller.

    I would also consider running the wire through a switch that has several selection points (not sure what this type of switch is called) instead of a speed controller.

    My questions:
    1. Which two wires do my hot and neutral wires go to on the fan?
    2. If you think it wiser to use a multi-position switch instead, I would need to know what all the wires do?
    3. I found this speed controller on ebay it is a: Adjustable Voltage Regulator AC SCR Motor Speed Control Controller 220V 2000W F5. It states that it is 50-220V. Does this mean it will work with 120V as well? Or do I need one that is titled 120VAC?
    Thank you for your help.

    -Mike
     
  2. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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    There's no real digital controls.

    It actually looks like a 3 speed fan. You need to confirm this. The yellow with green stripe is likely ground.

    In reality, it looks like they wanted to make the controls low voltage, so there is a transformer and possibly a rectifier and capacitor. I double the relays are AC.

    Your skill set combined with ours, aught to be able to figure out what's wrong.

    Take a pic of the PCB, front and back. Write down what you found on the black things - relays.

    Confirm the number of speeds.
    Writing on the relays
    Photo - front and back of the pcb

    You might include the switch.

    They used the low voltage relays for safety. Initial guess suggests that a pair of windings are used for each speed with yellow with green strip being ground.

    I'm expecting to see SPST or SPDT on the relays.
     
  3. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
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    Ok, I took some more pics to give your detective skills more data. Thank you for responding. The Yellow with green is ground for sure.
     
  4. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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    I need to do some thinking.

    1. Bet it blows fuses?

    Totally surprised it has a processor on it. Not sure why?

    The obliterated part might be an triac to turn on a light.

    the datasheet for the relays are here: http://www.datasheet-pdf.com/PDF/HRW-SS-112LM1-Datasheet-RCElectronics-850642

    Definately single pole and 12 VDC operated.

    Brain isn't functioning at optimum now. Stay tuned.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2016
  5. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    From what I am seeing it looks like a 6 speed fan motor so if you wanted to manually select the speed you would need a single pole 6 throw rotary switch to make it work or as you mentioned put a motor speed controller on the high-speed winding tap.

    As for finding which wire related to which speed a manual check of them one at a time will tell you which ones is the highest and which is the lowest.

    I'm going to guess and say Brown is the high and Blue is low and the rest are proportionally in between.

    Do you think that 120 is between 50 and 220? o_O
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2016
  6. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
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    tcmtech, thank you for this, I will give it a go.

    I do know 2+2=4 and 120 falls between 50-220 :eek: ; however, because of my ignorance of speed controller terminology and how they actually work, I wanted to know if the 220 in the title was an upper limit :) or a required input :( and later in the add when it said 50-220, I knew llogically this was the output options. I thought 220 might be the "required" input, but had an incling it was just the upper limit of voltage the controller could input, and was hoping that it could work with 120. I had seen some listed, more expensive, at 120v, and I wanted to save money by getting the one listed as 220v. From your comment, I deduce that it is merely the upper limit of voltage for the controller and it will work with the 120v as long as I am well under 2000watt limit.

    Again thank you very much. You are very kind to help a stranger solve his problems. I will test it out and see if it works.

    -Mike

    998361, member: 234053"]I need to do some thinking.

    1. Bet it blows fuses?

    Totally surprised it has a processor on it. Not sure why?

    The obliterated part might be an triac to turn on a light.[/QUOTE]
     
  7. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Even if it doesn't work I suspect you have wasted more money learning lesser things. :p
     
  8. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
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    :p Wow, electronics, philososphy, and religious faith. Thanks tcmtech. All that's lacking is epistemology :eek:.
     
  9. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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    204
    I basically agree with TCM for motor wiring. A fuse or incandescent light bulb can limit power for initial turn on.

    They were nice enough to essentially put the part numbers on the board.
    The charred component looks like it has a number near it. If the processor is shot, your SOL.
    The charred component probably goes to a light.

    But you should have 5V and 12 V across the 1000 uf or the one near it.

    That's if you even want to ATTEMPT a fix. This is where a model # may or may not be useful.
     
  10. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
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    Thank you. may be a waste, I have no intention of repairing the circuitry. If the motor can be turned on high speed, I will consider it fucntional for my purposes. I want to bypass all the circuitry and just have it as an on-off motor on high speed at this point. Just not sure which lead on the motor would get the neutral wire. Brown is high spd, so I assume it will get the hot wire.
     
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