Conductor as the secondary through a transformer Core

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by HighVoltage!, Aug 28, 2015.

  1. HighVoltage!

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 28, 2014
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    I am currently using a transformer to induce current to a cable that has a shield. The cable ends are shorted together (conductor-to-conductor touching)...The shield is open, meaning that they are not touching. Will them being open cause excess voltage? Or the shorting of the conductor "offset" this. Is there a mathematical explanation of this?
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    1) No, you aren't. You are not inducing current in a shield that is not connected to anything and you are not creating massive voltages in a shielded core wire that is shorted to itself. The mathematical explanation is that current will not flow in a not-a-circuit and voltage will not build up in a shorted out loop.
     
  3. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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    Its sort of like saying you are putting two conductors (Two secondarys) through a transformer one secondary conductor is shorted and the other is open. So your saying the open one wont create dangerous voltages??
     
  4. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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    Is it even possible to put two conductors as the secondary of a transformer? Will the "paralleled load" be halved?
     
  5. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    Are you using the shield to reduce capacitance coupling to the conductor? Normally you would ground one end of the capacitance shield. If you look at it as a magnetic circuit both wires are parallel to the transformer flux as one coil on top of another. A short in one wire (becoming the same as a massive eddy current loop and assuming the total flux in the transformer remains the same and the transformer does not burn from resistive heating) still leaves a parallel flux path for the induction of voltage on the open shield wire coil.

    If you short the filament voltage secondary in a tube high-voltage transformer the plate ac secondary output will still be there. (It might be reduced some due to losses in a real transformer)
     
  6. HighVoltage!

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 28, 2014
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    becau

    So if I was two use two conductors through a transformer, to reduce capacitance coupling between the two, I simply ground one shield? And from what your saying the "open conductor" will generate voltages.

    So the same result will occur if I have ONE conductor (Shielded cable as my secondary output), with the cables conductors touching and completing a loop while the shield is OPEN? What effects the resistance of the loop; the capacitance of the cable itself?
     
  7. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

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    [​IMG]
    It's to reduce the capacitive coupling between the primary and secondary(s) with shields about the power coil wires but most use a single grounded plate between the primary and secondary coils on a transformer for this shielding.

    I'm not exactly sure what the point of your question is. Are you using this cable for a reason or is it just an experiment to see what happens.
     
  8. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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  9. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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    This is a cable I need to heat up by inducing current through it. As mentioned previously, the cable is shielded; will leaving the shield open while the conductors are connected result is excessive voltages?

    Here is the link and slight explanation of what I am trying to do:

    http://www.haefely-hipotronics.com/_em-asset/HEAT_CYCLE_DS.pdf
     
  10. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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    my

    I am only using one CT
     
  11. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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    ?
     
  12. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    This hipotronics tester is rated in excess of 1/2 megawatts. There is no coaxial cable involved.
    Again, I say, "The full moon is tomorrow."
     
  13. nsaspook

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    The questions you ask make me wonder if you are qualified to handle this type of equipment so I'm out.
     
  14. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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    It was a never a coaxial cable...I was talking about a 1,500kcm conductor, insulated, copper shield
     
  15. HighVoltage!

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    Apr 28, 2014
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    I dont think your understanding me completely
     
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