conductivity of different metals

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by peteB1345, Aug 25, 2010.

  1. peteB1345

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 25, 2010
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    If I had two bare wires, one of niobium and one of 18% nickel silver twisted together and I introduced a DC current in to both at one end and completed the circuit at the other end would the flow be equal or less in one or no flow in one according to the conductivity of each metal? (The niobium wire has a higher conductivity. )
    Thanks for helping this complete novice, peteB1345
     
  2. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
    4,846
    63
    This depends on the size of the wires. If they have the same length and the same diameter, the will be more current through the wire with the higher conductivity.
     
  3. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
    594
    There will always be some current flowing in the higher resistance one.
     
  4. debjit625

    Well-Known Member

    Apr 17, 2010
    790
    186
    If you know the conductivity of the materials ,you are talking about then use ohms law
    V = I * R
    or I = V/R
    V is the voltage of the source
    R is the resistance of the material, and its the reciprocal of conductivity i.e.. 1/mho

    Good Luck
     
  5. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    Not quite -- conductivity is the reciprocal of resistivity; conductance is the reciprocal of resistance. The mho is an obsolete unit, replaced by the SI unit siemens.
     
  6. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
    2,358
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    I first ran into the SI unit when we took over this new building about 2 years ago, it's one thing I have to monitor on the cooling tower water. What are we going to rename next?
     
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