Computer Ignorant

Discussion in 'Computing and Networks' started by Thevenin's Planet, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. Thevenin's Planet

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 14, 2008
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    Hello
    I got a second hand Latitude C810 laptop which didn't have a Hard Drive in it,so I got that new,nothing on it.So I get this operating system free on disc called Ubuntu 10.10. The disc loads from the side.I get it to load,there this frame that ask do I would like try it out frist, so I agree.The next frame comes and ask about Partitioning the Hard drive?There are four choices.I choose manual.One says guided-use entire disk.(2)Ide1master(hda)-60 GB Fujitsu MHV206AT PL (3)Guided -use the largest continuous free space.Next frame says in horzontal across the top frame,/type/mount point/ format? /size.What is the function of these terminology?Also, there is a note that says "Make sure to allocate space for a root partition(/)with a minimum size of 2GB,and swap partition of at least 256 MB.The Hard Drive is IDE 250 GB.This is strange to me not knowing the terminology since I only use the web which is already assembled.Can I get some understanding upon this predictment of mine,computer Ignorant.:(
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2011
  2. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
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    You made boo-boo.

    When asked if you wanted to "Try Ubuntu" you selected "Install" instead. From that point it went into the installation specifics (which include specifying disk partitions and other stuff).

    Just reboot. And this time, make sure you really select "Try Ubuntu"!

    Have some patience as Linux is different (though bettter!) than Windows. You will struggle through the differences initially, but if you stick with it you may find you prefer Ubuntu.

    When you are ready to install Ubuntu permanently, just select the auto-partition option (using the full disk), and Ubuntu will choose all the right settings for you.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Thevenin's Planet

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 14, 2008
    183
    1
    Hi
    I did choose the circle or what suppose to be a disk or CD that says try Ubuntu. which is located on the left side.The Install is on the right side with its trademark. So what would go into the Device, column,mount point,format column and the size column.
    In the Device column, I got this example:
    /dev/hda: type=Fat 32: Mount point=/media/hda2: format=empty box: size 5132 MB.Second line:/dev/hda 1:type=ntfs: mount points=/media/hda1:size=26531MB: Third line:free space:the square box is empty.
    It seem to me that Ubuntu is giving one the opportunity to divide the Hard drive into perhaps different sub drives for other uses.The chance to design the drive accordingly to one's specification,which I assume is devices,type,mount point format and size.The "type", I found out to be a particular file system of some sort.How is the root established? Those are the things that have my mind confuse in regard to setting the system up for the basics,what ever that should be. Besides I would like to know for the love of knowledge.
     
  4. Norfindel

    Active Member

    Mar 6, 2008
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    9
    The "try it" option isn't supposed to ask you anything. If the hard disk has nothing on it, you could try to install it, the installer if quite simple if you follow the default options.
     
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  5. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
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    If you proceed with partitioning the drive, you are, in fact, installing Ubuntu, not "trying it". Be forewarned.

    If you do want to install, and you have nothing of consequence on the existing hard drive, simply select the automatic partitioning option that uses the full hard drive for Ubuntu.

    If you insist on doing it manually, you will need at a minimum two partitions: one file system partition, and one swap partition.

    Choose ext4 for your file system partition, make the mount point "/", and give it the full size of your disk less about 2 GB.

    Choose swap for your second partition, and make it the remainder of the disk (about 2 gb).
     
  6. Thevenin's Planet

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 14, 2008
    183
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    After it loaded or when the the trade market(suppose) the varing purple screen appear,then follows this option.And to the right of it is ,I guess what language to be translated in.
     
  7. Thevenin's Planet

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 14, 2008
    183
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    So, the "type" is ex4,but the section for "mount point" has this example: /media/hda2. Is media a general word for something specific?
    Furthermore,the column for "Device",this example is here, "/dev/hda".Is the word Device a general word for some specific device? Lastly,I don't understand what you mean about "make the mount point" .There is no mount point " /" in the "size column", just numbers with MB at the end,according to the example.L
     
  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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  9. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
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    Again, since you are unfamiliar with the terms, simply let the Ubuntu installer choose for you. It will automatically set up the system in an appropriate fashion.

    FYI: A device is an actual hardware device like a hard disk, floppy, serial interface, modem, etc. All devices are in a "top level" directory under "/dev". /dev/hda is the first (physical) hard drive in the system. Likewise, /dev/hdb is the second hard drive in the system, and so on. /dev/hda1 is the first physical partition of the first hard drive, /dev/hda2 is the second, and so on (the numbering scheme gets just a little bit more complicated when using "logical partitions" in addition to physical partitions.

    A "mount point" is where in the directory tree a partition's file system is actually exposed, or "mounted". In general, any partition with a valid file system can be mounted almost anywhere, but there is one mount point that *must* exist, and this is the "root" file system, which exists at the top of your directory tree "/". So, generally, the first partition of your first drive, i.e. /dev/hda1, is mounted on "/". I say generally, because if you are running a dual boot (with, for instance, Windows on your first partition), then your root directory is going to be some other physical partition, probably /dev/hda2.

    (Please don't confuse the "root" of your file system, "/" with the directory of the "root" user, "/root". These are two different things with, unfortunately, the same name!)

    For others reading this, just to make things more complicated, /dev/hda,b,c, etc., are for "old fashioned" IDE drives. Newer SATA drives (and flash drives) will be /dev/sda,b,c, etc.

    If you wish, you may think of your file system partitions in linux as the C:, D:, E:, ... drives in Windows, but Linux provides *far* more flexibility in how physical partitions map into your system. This is a *big* benefit, especially for "power users", but I won't go into specifics here as to why. Suffice to say that "mounting" of physical hardware in Linux is necessary, and just a little bit confusing for those from the Windows world.

    As I said above, a partition with a valid filesystem can be mounted just about anywhere within the directory structure. You asked about the /media directory. The /media directory is an area where Ubunu "automounts" *other* filesystems that you may be using. For instance, if you plug a USB drive, Ubuntu will automatically mount your drive in /media/somename, where "somename" is the name of the drive (or some other identifier).

    But, for your installation, you do not want to use /media! Again, your "main" partition *must* be mounted on "/". Or your system won't work.

    Please spend some time perusing the hundreds of Linux tutorials online. Things will seem complicated, and the going will initially be slow, but you will be well rewarded in the future by having a system that can do *far* more things than Windows can, and far more than you ever dreamed!
     
  10. victorhugo289

    Member

    Aug 24, 2010
    49
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    I've been using Ubuntu since 9.04 (that is 2009/April), the one you have is 10.10 (2010/October), it's my primary operating system along with Windows Xp.
    I've found that if you have questions about Ubuntu you go to the Ubuntu forums they will help you in there a lot.
    The partitioning part is one of the most documented parts ever, newbies and first time users are always asking about that, I know I did,, this is because Ubuntu is careful, it doesn't overwrite everything you have in your computer and gives you choices, unlike other operating systems like Windows that do not ask questions and wipe the entire disk to put themselves as the "one and only".

    Install Ubuntu, and you will like it a lot, but you need to dedicate it some time.
     
  11. Thevenin's Planet

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 14, 2008
    183
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    A "mount point" is where in the directory tree a partition's file system is actually exposed, or "mounted". In general, any partition with a valid file system can be mounted almost anywhere, but there is one mount point that *must* exist, and this is the "root" file system, which exists at the top of your directory tree "/". So, generally, the first partition of your first drive, i.e. /dev/hda1, is mounted on "/". I say generally, because if you are running a dual boot (with, for instance, Windows on your first partition), then your root directory is going to be some other physical partition, probably /dev/hda2.
    [/QUOTE]

    Are you saying that Device column should have /dev/hda1 and type column should have file ext4 and mount point column should have just the / (forward slash ) in it ? And the swap have the size you suggested ? How do I establish the root file system? lastly what about the used column ?
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  12. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
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    Sorry, TP...I haven't memorized the partitioning dialog, so I don't remember what the 'used' column is that you are asking about.

    Otherwise, yes, you have understood correctly. By choosing the '/' mount point, your root file system will be established automatically with no further action required by you.

    BTW, you could have been done a long time ago by just letting the Ubuntu installer do its thing automatically.

    Also, you could have installed and reinstalled about 20 times already...and you would have figured it out yourself by now (and, you'd be an Ubuntu install expert!).

    Finally, I'd like to leave you with a link to my favorite Ubuntu based wiki:

    http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Natty

    This guide will help you find and install whatever programs you need. It is a very well maintained site, and very informative. It is always my first visit with a new Ubuntu installation.
     
  13. Thevenin's Planet

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 14, 2008
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  14. joeyd999

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    Jun 6, 2011
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    I prefer "trial-by-fire" myself... :D
     
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