Component Identification

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Sam., Sep 17, 2009.

  1. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    Hello, I was wondering if anyone here could help me. The fan in my PS3 has recently stopped working, I think due to being blasted with high pressure compressed air (Not the smartest of things to do). I've opened it up, and found a surface mount component beside the fan connector's 12v that seems like it has blew.
    Does anyone know what this component is?
    [​IMG]
    Thanks.
     
  2. ELECTRONERD

    Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
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    It looks like a ceramic capacitor. Won't be able to tell the value unless you have the schematic.
     
  3. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    I think it'd be pretty hard to find a schematic :(
    Most of the SMD components are numbered, apart from this one. From testing with a continuity tester, it does seem to be on the 12v power to the fan. Would there be a problem briding it with a piece of wire?
     
  4. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    It's not a cap but an inductor.
    One trick is to see other similar components around and check for continuity. Resistors can be identified easily.
    If u get continuity then it is an inductor, if not then a capacitor.
    There will sometimes be 0Ω bridges, and will be donated as FB. If an inductor, it will be donated by a suffix LXX ( where XXX can be the any numerical no. but definitely not the inductance value).
    If an inductor, bridging will sometimes work in most cases, if it is in the B+ path to the fan then u have no problem in bridging it, though this method is always not recommended.


    Rifaa
     
  5. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    Here's an updated picture:
    [​IMG]
    There is continuity between 1 and 2, and 2 and 3. There is no continuity between 3 and 4, but there is continuity between 4 and 5.
     
  6. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Then U have burnt tracks and faulty compo's
    Can U get a clear PIC or try removing the components with a HOT gun to see the tracks.
    Make a note of ur compo layout.

    Rifaa
     
  7. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    I can only verify with a clear closeup. Sorry!

    Rifaa
     
  8. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    I'll try getting a clear picture, but it's quite difficult.
     
  9. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    Slightly better:
    [​IMG]
     
  10. ELECTRONERD

    Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
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    Sam,

    Do you have a meter? If you do, put it on the resistance setting and see if you get a short. If you do, it is probably an inductor, and if it isn't, it's probably a cap. Although, if there was too much strain and if it was an inductor, the wire inside could have melted. The thing to do would be to identify whether it's a cap or inductor and go from there. Usually a part of that size would be within a lower range of values. Also, is there any part identification near the component? It may say C3 or L5 or something like that. The "3" and "5" denote the cap or inductor number.
     
  11. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    It was a quite high pressure blast of compressed air that I fear turned the fan the wrong way and caused this to happen. There are no markings on the board to identify the part. I'll try a multimeter tomorrow.

    Thanks
     
  12. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Yup ! An Inductor. It's in series with the supply pin.
    But the short u a getting across the cap before the inductor is not good. Remove this cap and check if the short exists across the tracks of this cap. If not then the bypass cap is shorted. U can mount a 0.47μf 16V cap or a ceramic with 104 denotion will do just fine, and bypass the inductor.
    but before that check the burned tracks to see the board damage, if it is not severe scrape of the black stuff.
    You'll be OK.

    Rifaa
     
  13. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    Hi, it is only the component marked in red that does not have continuity, is this the inductor (The left part of it can be moved, seems to have broke free from the pcb)?
    [​IMG]
    Thanks :cool:
     
  14. ELECTRONERD

    Senior Member

    May 26, 2009
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    Can you measure capacitance with your meter?
     
  15. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    Don't think so :(
     
  16. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Doesn't matter which way the fan turns, compressed air forcing the fan to turn faster than it's rated speed always blows it out. This is because the counter EMF generates more voltage than the semiconductors can handle. Brushless fans use a specialty chip that sequences 6 coils.
     
  17. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    Ah, that makes sense. I do remember hearing a "pop" sound a while after I done it (When the Playstation was turned on). I'm fairly sure that the part circled in red is the only thing broken, as the playstation works fine, but its fan doesn't turn on.
     
  18. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Fans are cheap. Look for a quality ball bearing unit. If you give us voltages and dimensions we can help you find a new one.

    For now, stick a high volume fan outside where the other one is if you want to use the unit. The fans are absolutely necessary, you will blow the unit without them.
     
  19. Sam.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 17, 2009
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    The fan is proprietary, I've bought a new one and it still doesn't work, hence me opening the unit and finding the burnt component circled in the picture above :)
     
  20. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    So what are the dimensions and voltage specs (if you know them). Dimensions can be measured.

    Is it worth sending the unit in?

    BTW, it is possible that is a fuse that is blown. Fuses come in all sizes and shapes. If practical measure the voltage across where the fan goes and the part with power applied.
     
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