Coil turns and frequency

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by veenife, May 27, 2014.

  1. veenife

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 16, 2014
    42
    0
    Hi,

    ive read an article about speakers impedance... they mentioned that if a speaker has more turns it will increase inductance and then the speaker will respond BETTER to high frequencies....

    i tought it would be the opposite!

    i mean more inductance creates more resistance against high frequencies or???

    is that because it is an reproduction device (speaker)???

    i mean with a moving coil microphone (generator) ... if the mic has more turns in its coil that will cause more inductance and the mic would have its reponse with LESS high frequencies... right???

    can anyone make it more clear to me???
     
  2. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    I can confirm that more turns gives the coil a higher inductance. Can't comment on the rest.
     
  3. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
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    more turns means more weight, more weight, more mass, more mass, less high frequency complience. as well as more inductance.
     
  4. veenife

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 16, 2014
    42
    0
    yeah right,
    but this guy wrote on his article that speakers of 16 ohms will have an increase on the high frequenciy response...

    here is what he stated:

    "... If the same voice coil was wound to be 16 ohms, a smaller, lighter wire would be used and the number of turns would be increased to achieve the desired impedance. This will change the physical characteristics of the wound coil, which may slightly affect the sensitivity and frequency response of the speaker. A higher number of turns in the 16-ohm coil may slightly increase the response of the speaker at higher frequencies due to an increase in inductance...."


    here is the article...

    http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/Does_Speaker_Impedance_Affect_Tone


    is he wrong or aint i getting something here?
     
  5. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,094
    3,033
    A smaller wire gauge might weigh less, even while providing more turns?

    But I think the simple explanation is that the author was speculating and got it wrong. I wouldn't worry about it unless I found it in other sources also.
     
  6. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
    5,991
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    More turns is more inductance and, therefore, more inductive reactance and (assuming equivalent DC resistance) more turns would equal a higher magnetic field which yields more force on the voice coil (a stronger response).

    The problem with the author's logic is that he forgets that a thick copper wire that is long enough to give 16 ohms of DC resistance will be much longer than a thin wire with 16 ohms of resistance. It is difficult to get more turns when you are given a shorter wire.
     
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