circuit board design

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Cody James, Aug 12, 2015.

  1. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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    Hey everyone I'm looking for a little assistance. I'm looking to have a circuit designed that will operate on 3 volts and will rotate a servo in a 90 degree sweeping motion with a slight pause at each end of the motion (90 degree rotation including pause to last 2 seconds) is this something that can be done? Cost would be a factor as I would need to have this board produced by a manufacturer. Any input would be appreciated!
     
  2. TheButtonThief

    Active Member

    Feb 26, 2011
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    Of course it can be done
     
  3. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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    I apologize I'm learning about this stuff as I go as to someday be the guy possibly giving answers! Is this something complex in nature or is it simpler than one may think?
     
  4. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    It's certainly possible to do, but in order for anyone to design it for you they would need a lot more information than you have provided.
     
  5. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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    I have most of the information I believe on would need I just am unsure what information is needed, servo is an sg90, sweep 90 degrees continuously while power is applied, timing of sweep is roughly 1-1.5 seconds with a delay of .5-1 second at each end of the sweep, load is very minimal, power supply is 3v (2 c batteries) what else is needed?
     
  6. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    A link to a datasheet of said servo would be helpful for example.
     
  7. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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  8. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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  9. TheButtonThief

    Active Member

    Feb 26, 2011
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    A micro controller is your best bet but you'd need a supply of at least 5 volts and there'd be a learning curve when it comes to programming.

    Take a look at the Arduino UNO, it's a simplified programming platform and I'm sure there are libraries for servos.
     
  10. ISB123

    Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
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    I probably could do it in my spare time should be fairly simple.Waiting for more details.
     
  11. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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    Any details you may need let me know when you have time, the catch to this may be that I'd prefer not to use a controller but I'm not sure if that's a possibility..
     
  12. DerStrom8

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    Feb 20, 2011
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    Other information we would need:
    • Do you have any size/space constraints?
    • SMD or through-hole circuitry?
    • You say cost is a factor. What are your limits?
    • How accurate must the timing be?
    • What will it be used for?
    • Are you open to programming (a microcontroller)?
    • What is your power supply?
    • What is the operating environment like?
    • How often does it need to run?
    All of this is information would be very helpful (if not required) to design the project properly.
     
  13. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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    Size/space : as long as it's around 2x2 (width is more of a factor than length)
    Circuitry : from an assembly standpoint whichever is most cost/time effective
    Cost : I'd like to be able to make the board for $6 or less
    Timing : timing is not critical in the least the timing I provided is what my working sample does and it provides the effect i like but it has wiggle room
    Use : to rotate(oscillate) an object mounted to a stationary base
    Programming : would prefer no programming
    Power supply : 2 d cell batteries (3v)
    Environment : cold temps possible (30-50 degrees Fahrenheit)
    Operating time : when in use could run for several hours (3-5)
     
  14. TheButtonThief

    Active Member

    Feb 26, 2011
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    Your 3V supply criteria posses very limiting restraints, there's not allot you can do with 3V.

    Some programming will be required, even if a board does exist to do what you want, it won't be designed with your variables in mind (eg, rotate 90 degrees, pause for 2 seconds, rotate back, pause for 2 seconds, repeat)

    Regarding environment, we need more than ambient temperature, for instance will the servo start working automatically or by manual input? Is noise a factor? Will the "board" be a significant distance from the servo, power source or input? Will the device be working indoors or outdoors?
     
  15. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    I'm sure this is possible. I would recommend surface mount to keep space down (though if you plan on assembling or repairing it yourself, you will need to learn how to do surface mount work)

    See above

    That's about how much you'd be paying in parts (maybe you'd be paying a little less, but not much, especially if you don't use a microcontroller). No professional PCB manufacturing company is going to make you one 2" x 2" board for that cheap, at least not in those quantities. I would recommend DirtyPCBs. You must order a minimum of 10, but 10 5cm x 5cm boards will only cost you $14 total. Still, that's only the bare board--They won't assemble it for you, and you'll still have to buy the parts separately. It'll cost MUCH more than $6.

    Wiggle room is nice, especially if you don't use a micro. It's much more difficult to get accurate timing without a timer module and a crystal oscillator.

    This still is not very descriptive. What is it moving? What kind of weight are we looking at? Please be more specific.

    Microcontrollers are probably out of the question then.

    You won't be able to power a whole lot from 3v. Can you use more batteries? A 12-volt supply, for example, would be easy to work with.

    Noted. Driving a servo, I wouldn't run it on batteries, but that's just my own personal preference. How often is it used? A description of what exactly it is would help here. I would be concerned that it would drain the batteries quickly, so I would pursue a wall wart solution.

    Matt
     
  16. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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    The application requires batteries, the battery configuration is ideal because I have a large stock of holders to use.
    Quantity/cost : There would be potential for larger quantities possibly around 100+
    Everything will be turned on and off from a simple switch noise isn't much of an issue.
    its used to rotate a small plastic head weight is very minimal I'm talking like as heavy as a granola bar.
    The current setup I'm using operated for 4 hours continuously (before I shut it off) using a 3.7v 600mah lipo battery.
    Device will be outdoors but elements shouldn't be an issue.
    Distances between board, servo, power supply will be all contained within 6" +/-
     
  17. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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    I can get an accurate weight after work today.
     
  18. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    If talking RC servo there are plenty of examples by Google for simple PWM controller as well as previous posts here.
    Max.
     
  19. Cody James

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2015
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  20. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Just throwing out my $0.02
    The motion you want "can" be accomplished with a continuously rotating device and "mechanical" linkages to avoid the whole servo/micro/complexity aspect..
    Simple example
     
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