Charging issue with a handheld transmitter

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Chad Koenig, Sep 19, 2015.

  1. Chad Koenig

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 19, 2015
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    Hi my names Chad.


    I searched a bit for an answer to a problem I have but wasn't able to find one. Or if I did I wasn't smart enough to realize so I'm posting a question for my first time ever about anything.


    I have a sportdog brand field trainer 425 which is simply a dog training collar with a multi function transmitter. The transmitter wont charge its battery when I plug it in. I took the battery out and charged it directly to test the transmitter and it works great. It's a 3.7v lithium battery but when i checked the voltage where the battery plugs into the circuit board its only getting .6 or about a half volt reading on my meter. Does anyone know what the problem is or could u help me to troubleshoot the issue? Thank you for any response!
     
  2. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
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    1,215
    Chad
    It sound like the charging circuit in the transmitter is bad or the power supply is bad. Does this thing use a "wall wart" kind of power supply? If it does, have you checked its output?
     
  3. Chad Koenig

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 19, 2015
    2
    0
    It has a wall charger that splits at the end, one for the collar and one for the transmitter. They both r good. The transmitter resembles a handheld walkie talkie. To charge the battery I removed it from the transmitter and jumped it directly to the charger. Then I reconnected it to verify it was good as well as the transmitter itself actually worked. So I have the issue narrowed down to the circuitry on the circuit board from the input plug of the charger to the battery connection. I don't know what that path is or how to test the components in that path. Or as I'd hoped, to be told simply what the most likely failed component was and how to repair it. But maybe it's not as simple as I was hoping or not as standard of a setup as I assumed. Anyway, that is a more thorough description of where I'm at with it.
     
  4. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
    1,957
    1,215
    Good fault location so far. If you can gain access to the PCB, look for cracks in the traces or cold solder joints (magnifying glass). A good clear photo of the board would help a lot.
     
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