Charge in Capacitor question

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by electronicsstudent09, Nov 8, 2009.

  1. electronicsstudent09

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 8, 2009
    1
    0
    Hello,

    I would like to know if I am understanding this correctly.

    Charge in a cap is directly proportional to the voltage across it.

    So if thats the case, if 100V is across a cap storing 100uc, when the voltage across the cap is doubled to 200V, then the charge in the cap is doubled to 200uc.

    If this is true, then the capacitance is Q/V=> 200uc/200V=1uF

    Please clarify if I am wrong on something. Thanks!
     
  2. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
    5,448
    782
    You've got it right.:)
     
  3. Ratch

    New Member

    Mar 20, 2007
    1,068
    3
    electronicsstudent09,

    No, the imbalance of charge is directly proportional to the voltage across it. Whatever charge you accumulate on one plate of the capacitor is depleted on the other plate for a net charge of zero. This imbalance of charge causes a voltage to form. The ratio of charge imbalance to voltage is capacitance.

    Ratch
     
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